Not sure whether you should walk down the aisle? Well, a new study says getting married could be good for your heart.

After surveying 3.5 million women and men across the nation, researchers at NYU's Langone Medical Center concluded that marriage lowers the risk of heart disease by 5 percent. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Luchoang nguyen)

The study also showed people who are widowed have a 3 percent higher chance of getting any vascular disease and for divorced people, a 5 percent higher chance. (Via New York University)

And apparently, marriage was most beneficial to those younger than 50. The study says married people in that age group had a 12 percent lower risk of heart problems. (Via Flickr / James Gordon)

But cardiologist Tara Narula said on "CBS This Morning" the quality of the marriage makes a big difference. This study applies to married couples who have good relationships.

"Married couples help each other to eat better, exercise, avoid smoking and alcohol. They serve as a buffer for stressful life events for each other. They encourage each other to take their medications and go to doctors' appointments."

Now, if you're worried about your heart health, one doctor told HeathDay regardless of your marital status, "Don't smoke; eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet; sweat every day; achieve your ideal body weight; and stay on your medicines."

Marriage Is Good For Heart Health, Study Says

by Candice Aviles
0
Transcript
Mar 28, 2014

Marriage Is Good For Heart Health, Study Says

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons / Luchoang nguyen)

BY Candice Aviles

Not sure whether you should walk down the aisle? Well, a new study says getting married could be good for your heart.

After surveying 3.5 million women and men across the nation, researchers at NYU's Langone Medical Center concluded that marriage lowers the risk of heart disease by 5 percent. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Luchoang nguyen)

The study also showed people who are widowed have a 3 percent higher chance of getting any vascular disease and for divorced people, a 5 percent higher chance. (Via New York University)

And apparently, marriage was most beneficial to those younger than 50. The study says married people in that age group had a 12 percent lower risk of heart problems. (Via Flickr / James Gordon)

But cardiologist Tara Narula said on "CBS This Morning" the quality of the marriage makes a big difference. This study applies to married couples who have good relationships.

"Married couples help each other to eat better, exercise, avoid smoking and alcohol. They serve as a buffer for stressful life events for each other. They encourage each other to take their medications and go to doctors' appointments."

Now, if you're worried about your heart health, one doctor told HeathDay regardless of your marital status, "Don't smoke; eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet; sweat every day; achieve your ideal body weight; and stay on your medicines."

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