As the marijuana movement continues toward widespread legalization in the U.S., some law enforcement officers are hopping on the bandwagon. 


Like this man, 36-year-old Patrick Moen. He's spent 10 years with the DEA focused on large scale drug trafficking. 


But he recently left his job at the agency and joined a private equity firm focused on investing in the booming marijuana business.


"There came a point in time in my career when I realized that targeting marijuana was not an effective use of our resources."

"How do your old DEA buddies feel about your new career?"

"I have to be honest, it's been overwhelmingly positive."


In recent months, it's been win after win for the budding marijuana industry. It's already being referred to as the "green rush". 


In early January, Colorado became the first state to sell marijuana for purely recreational purposes to anyone over the age of 21. (Via Denver Post)


Washington will start selling pot sometime in the summer of 2014. More than 2,500 applications for licenses to grow have been sent in. 


And just a few days ago, President Obama declared his support for the herb in an interview with The New Yorker. He said it's important for legalization to go forward — and that marijuana isn't any more dangerous than alcohol. 


Many still have reservations though — some at the DEA are scared. A top official at the agency said decriminalizing marijuana is "reckless and irresponsible".


Widespread legalization is still a long ways away. Only two states, Colorado and Washington, have fully legalized the drug, but Alaska could be next


Meet The DEA Agent Who Joined The Pot Industry

by Charlie McKeague
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Transcript
Jan 22, 2014

Meet The DEA Agent Who Joined The Pot Industry

(Image source: Privateer Holdings)

BY Charlie McKeague

As the marijuana movement continues toward legalization in the U.S., some law enforcement officers are hopping on the bandwagon. 


Like this man, 36-year-old Patrick Moen. He's spent 10 years with the DEA focused on large scale drug trafficking. 


But he recently left his job at the agency and joined a private equity firm focused on investing in the booming marijuana business.


"There came a point in time in my career when I realized that targeting marijuana was not an effective use of our resources."

"How do your old DEA buddies feel about your new career?"

"I have to be honest, it's been overwhelmingly positive."


In recent months, it's been win after win for the budding marijuana industry. It's already being referred to as the "green rush". 


In early January, Colorado became the first state to sell marijuana for purely recreational purposes to anyone over the age of 21. (Via Denver Post)


Washington will start selling pot sometime in the summer of 2014. More than 2,500 applications for licenses to grow have been sent in. 


And just a few days ago, President Obama declared his support for the herb in an interview with The New Yorker. He said it's important for legalization to go forward — and that marijuana isn't any more dangerous than alcohol. 


Many still have reservations though — some at the DEA are scared. A top official at the agency said decriminalizing marijuana is "reckless and irresponsible".


Widespread legalization is still a long ways away. Only two states, Colorado and Washington, have fully legalized the drug, but Alaska could be next

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