(Thumbnail image: Al Jazeera English)

 

"The Maoists reportedly attacked Indian police on patrol.  When their colleagues came to their rescue, the fighters ambushed their bus." (Al Jazeera English)

Maoist insurgents ambushed Indian police on patrol, killing as many as 75.  It is the worst attack on the Indian government in recent memory.  

We're looking into the group which launched the attacks -- the Naxalites -- Maoist separatists. They've been fighting the Indian government since the 1960s. 

 

This attack was the latest and largest in a string of recent attacks across a region called the Red Corridor.  Here's Al Jazeera English.

"The Prime Minister -- Manmohan Singh -- calls the Naxalites the biggest security challenge to India since independence.  Now they operate across a third of the country -- known as the Red Corridor...

 

"Now it's estimated that there are some 8,000 fighters in India, and according to the government, the movement extorts $300 million from companies every single year."

The Naxalites have broad support among tribes and villages across the Red Zone.  Many of whom provide the rebels safe harbor against government forces. 

 

Asian News International reports the government has tried to counter by providing more services like health clinics.  But the Maoist spread continues.

"Hundreds of villagers from Muraipor District -- both Maoist infested villages attended the camp.

 

"Maoists have spread into rural pockets -- in 20 of India's 28 states -- and the movement has marred business potentially worth billions of dollars in many industries in central and eastern India."    

But the government hasn't been able to make inroads on the backroads of India.  Where there is mistrust.  The Financial Times reports, many locals believe the government simply wants to stabilize the region for industry to move in.

"But with Indian and foreign companies now hungry for the resources of these long-neglected remote regions, New Delhi is stepping up military efforts to retake areas under Maoist control, through a campaign that has been dubbed 'Operation Greenhunt.'"

Despite its protests against the attacks -- the executive director of the Institute of Conflict Management says, the government is going to have to do more than disparage the Naxalites to defeat them.

"Political rhetoric about the ‘cowardice’, ‘savagery’ and ‘brutality’ of the Maoists will, moreover, do nothing to undermine the support base that the rebels are able to secure or coerce." (DNA)

 

Writer: Newsy Staff

Producer: Nathan Giannini

Maoist Rebels Attack Indian Police

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
Apr 7, 2010

Maoist Rebels Attack Indian Police

(Thumbnail image: Al Jazeera English)

 

"The Maoists reportedly attacked Indian police on patrol.  When their colleagues came to their rescue, the fighters ambushed their bus." (Al Jazeera English)

Maoist insurgents ambushed Indian police on patrol, killing as many as 75.  It is the worst attack on the Indian government in recent memory.  

We're looking into the group which launched the attacks -- the Naxalites -- Maoist separatists. They've been fighting the Indian government since the 1960s. 

 

This attack was the latest and largest in a string of recent attacks across a region called the Red Corridor.  Here's Al Jazeera English.

"The Prime Minister -- Manmohan Singh -- calls the Naxalites the biggest security challenge to India since independence.  Now they operate across a third of the country -- known as the Red Corridor...

 

"Now it's estimated that there are some 8,000 fighters in India, and according to the government, the movement extorts $300 million from companies every single year."

The Naxalites have broad support among tribes and villages across the Red Zone.  Many of whom provide the rebels safe harbor against government forces. 

 

Asian News International reports the government has tried to counter by providing more services like health clinics.  But the Maoist spread continues.

"Hundreds of villagers from Muraipor District -- both Maoist infested villages attended the camp.

 

"Maoists have spread into rural pockets -- in 20 of India's 28 states -- and the movement has marred business potentially worth billions of dollars in many industries in central and eastern India."    

But the government hasn't been able to make inroads on the backroads of India.  Where there is mistrust.  The Financial Times reports, many locals believe the government simply wants to stabilize the region for industry to move in.

"But with Indian and foreign companies now hungry for the resources of these long-neglected remote regions, New Delhi is stepping up military efforts to retake areas under Maoist control, through a campaign that has been dubbed 'Operation Greenhunt.'"

Despite its protests against the attacks -- the executive director of the Institute of Conflict Management says, the government is going to have to do more than disparage the Naxalites to defeat them.

"Political rhetoric about the ‘cowardice’, ‘savagery’ and ‘brutality’ of the Maoists will, moreover, do nothing to undermine the support base that the rebels are able to secure or coerce." (DNA)

 

Writer: Newsy Staff

Producer: Nathan Giannini

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