(Image source: adactio / flickr)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


Starting Thursday, television viewers in the U.S. may find their experience a bit more... peaceful.

“Starting at midnight tonight, those too-loud television commercials are supposed to go away forever. And if you complain about them, like we do in our house, now there’s a place where you can officially complain.” (Video via NBC News)

The FCC now has a complaint line and is collecting reports on ads that are louder than their accompanying programming.

Loud commercials were such a common complaint that Congress passed the CALM Act last year to try to put an end to the headaches.

All broadcasters, cable companies and satellite providers are required to follow a new protocol to regulate loudness across programming and channels. (Via Advanced Television Systems Committee)

Of course, that takes new equipment. The FCC gave the companies one year to comply, which expires Thursday.

Small broadcasters were able to request an extra year if they can prove they can’t afford to make the switch. A reporter for the Nashua Telegraph says at least 50 small stations have been granted extensions.

So loud commercials might not completely disappear, but if your local station still blasts car commercials and heartburn relief, there are a few things you can do besides keep the remote handy at all times.

A writer for Today says many newer TVs already have a setting called “Automatic Volume Control” or “Auto Volume” the produces a similar effect. There are also audio controllers for sale online that can be hooked up to a television.

Loud Commercials Ban Goes Into Effect Thursday

by Steven Sparkman
1
Transcript
Dec 12, 2012

Loud Commercials Ban Goes Into Effect Thursday

 

(Image source: adactio / flickr)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


Starting Thursday, television viewers in the U.S. may find their experience a bit more... peaceful.

“Starting at midnight tonight, those too-loud television commercials are supposed to go away forever. And if you complain about them, like we do in our house, now there’s a place where you can officially complain.” (Video via NBC News)

The FCC now has a complaint line and is collecting reports on ads that are louder than their accompanying programming.

Loud commercials were such a common complaint that Congress passed the CALM Act last year to try to put an end to the headaches.

All broadcasters, cable companies and satellite providers are required to follow a new protocol to regulate loudness across programming and channels. (Via Advanced Television Systems Committee)

Of course, that takes new equipment. The FCC gave the companies one year to comply, which expires Thursday.

Small broadcasters were able to request an extra year if they can prove they can’t afford to make the switch. A reporter for the Nashua Telegraph says at least 50 small stations have been granted extensions.

So loud commercials might not completely disappear, but if your local station still blasts car commercials and heartburn relief, there are a few things you can do besides keep the remote handy at all times.

A writer for Today says many newer TVs already have a setting called “Automatic Volume Control” or “Auto Volume” the produces a similar effect. There are also audio controllers for sale online that can be hooked up to a television.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3