(Image source: Davincibio.org)

 

BY SUZANA DALUL

 

A team of researchers may have discovered a lost masterpiece — Leonardo Da Vinci’s “The Battle of Anghiari.” They think the painting, which depicts an epic battle on horseback, is hidden behind Giorgio Vasari’s work in the Florence Town Hall. The Washington Post explains how the findings were made:

“A research team has drilled small holes in the Vasari work and encountered an air cavity.”

Art historian Maurizio Seracini — featured in Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code” — led the team that found the cavity. According to Discovery — the researchers have taken probes from the wall behind Vasari’s “Battle of Marciano” and are optimistic about the results.

 

“Analysis with a scanning electron microscope revealed the black material had an unusual chemical makeup of manganese and iron. The compound corresponds to the ‘black pigment found in brown glazes on Leonardo's 'Mona Lisa' and 'St John the Baptist’…”

The original painting hasn’t been seen for more than 500 years. But the BBC notes, while the drilling has excited some, it’s upsetting others.

“The research has been controversial, with some art experts signing a petition to stop the investigation because the drilling is damaging Vasari's existing work.”

On the other hand, some think Vasari himself might have made effort to preserve Da Vinci’s painting. The Guardian reports, supporters point to a mysterious detail.

“Seracini’s suspicion that Vasari did not want to destroy Leonardo's work, preferring to brick it up and add his own fresco, were reinforced when he found Vasari had painted a soldier in his fresco holding a flag on which was written: ‘He who seeks, finds.’”

The findings are not conclusive yet, but the Telegraph says if they were to be confirmed, it would be big news in the art world:

 

“More work needs to be done, but the findings seem to have solved a 500-year-old mystery and could represent one of the biggest discoveries in the history of art for decades.”

But TheMarkNews think the discovery will inspire fiction nonetheless:

“We’re sure Dan Brown is dusting off his typewriter… to whip up a Da Vinci Code sequel as we speak."

Long Lost Da Vinci Painting Discovered?

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Sources:BBCThe Mark
Transcript
Mar 12, 2012

Long Lost Da Vinci Painting Discovered?

(Image source: Davincibio.org)

 

BY SUZANA DALUL

 

A team of researchers may have discovered a lost masterpiece — Leonardo Da Vinci’s “The Battle of Anghiari.” They think the painting, which depicts an epic battle on horseback, is hidden behind Giorgio Vasari’s work in the Florence Town Hall. The Washington Post explains how the findings were made:

“A research team has drilled small holes in the Vasari work and encountered an air cavity.”

Art historian Maurizio Seracini — featured in Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code” — led the team that found the cavity. According to Discovery — the researchers have taken probes from the wall behind Vasari’s “Battle of Marciano” and are optimistic about the results.

 

“Analysis with a scanning electron microscope revealed the black material had an unusual chemical makeup of manganese and iron. The compound corresponds to the ‘black pigment found in brown glazes on Leonardo's 'Mona Lisa' and 'St John the Baptist’…”

The original painting hasn’t been seen for more than 500 years. But the BBC notes, while the drilling has excited some, it’s upsetting others.

“The research has been controversial, with some art experts signing a petition to stop the investigation because the drilling is damaging Vasari's existing work.”

On the other hand, some think Vasari himself might have made effort to preserve Da Vinci’s painting. The Guardian reports, supporters point to a mysterious detail.

“Seracini’s suspicion that Vasari did not want to destroy Leonardo's work, preferring to brick it up and add his own fresco, were reinforced when he found Vasari had painted a soldier in his fresco holding a flag on which was written: ‘He who seeks, finds.’”

The findings are not conclusive yet, but the Telegraph says if they were to be confirmed, it would be big news in the art world:

 

“More work needs to be done, but the findings seem to have solved a 500-year-old mystery and could represent one of the biggest discoveries in the history of art for decades.”

But TheMarkNews think the discovery will inspire fiction nonetheless:

“We’re sure Dan Brown is dusting off his typewriter… to whip up a Da Vinci Code sequel as we speak."

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