(Image source: Flickr / radiowood2000)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

Socialist candidate Francois Hollande edged out French President Nicolas Sarkozy in the presidential election’s first round of voting Sunday. The results mean those two candidates alone will enter a runoff election May 6. The BBC has the details on Hollande’s narrow win.

 

“Francois Hollande, the Socialist candidate … on 28.6 percent. Nicolas Sarkozy behind on 1.6 percent with 27 percent. Marine Le Pen on 19 percent.”

 

Hollande served as head of the French Socialist party from 1997 to 2008. In a rally with supporters Sunday evening, the left-wing candidate struck a celebratory tone. Sky News has his comments.

 

“It is an act of trust in the plan which I’ve prevented before French people to bring justice to our country and to control finance.”

 

ITV reports Hollande’s agenda offers a stark contrast to Sarkozy’s, promising tax reform and a stronger bond with Europe’s progressive elements. But the impressive showing from far-right candidate Marine Le Pen — who grabbed 19 percent of the vote — could help put Sarkozy over the top. ITV explains.

 

“Those far-right and far-left votes will get put into the mix for the right wing and left wing candidates, so if Hollande doesn’t inherit as much as he’d hoped and Sarkozy gets rather more than he hopes, well, he might not be out of this race at all.”

 

France 24 reports Le Pen wasn’t alone in beating expectations Sunday. Overall voter turnout rates topped expectations as well.

 

“Despite fears that a lacklustre campaign combined with school holidays would lead to a historically low turnout, the French flocked to polls. Official results showed that the abstention rate in the first round at 5pm was around 19%. That abstention figure was only slightly higher than the score recorded in 2007.”

 

A writer for The Guardian says a failing economy has already doomed a series of political heavyweights — from Gordon Brown to Silvio Berlusconi. He writes Sarkozy could be next to fall.

 

“A victory for Hollande would not just be another run-of-the-mill ousting of any old European incumbent. It would be the victory of a Socialist, and in one of the two most important countries in Europe. That makes it an event with big potential consequences not just for France, where the left has been out of power for 17 years, but for Europe.”

Left-Wing Hollande Tops Sarkozy in First-Round Voting

by Zach Toombs
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Transcript
Apr 23, 2012

Left-Wing Hollande Tops Sarkozy in First-Round Voting

(Image source: Flickr / radiowood2000)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

Socialist candidate Francois Hollande edged out French President Nicolas Sarkozy in the presidential election’s first round of voting Sunday. The results mean those two candidates alone will enter a runoff election May 6. The BBC has the details on Hollande’s narrow win.

 

“Francois Hollande, the Socialist candidate … on 28.6 percent. Nicolas Sarkozy behind on 1.6 percent with 27 percent. Marine Le Pen on 19 percent.”

 

Hollande served as head of the French Socialist party from 1997 to 2008. In a rally with supporters Sunday evening, the left-wing candidate struck a celebratory tone. Sky News has his comments.

 

“It is an act of trust in the plan which I’ve prevented before French people to bring justice to our country and to control finance.”

 

ITV reports Hollande’s agenda offers a stark contrast to Sarkozy’s, promising tax reform and a stronger bond with Europe’s progressive elements. But the impressive showing from far-right candidate Marine Le Pen — who grabbed 19 percent of the vote — could help put Sarkozy over the top. ITV explains.

 

“Those far-right and far-left votes will get put into the mix for the right wing and left wing candidates, so if Hollande doesn’t inherit as much as he’d hoped and Sarkozy gets rather more than he hopes, well, he might not be out of this race at all.”

 

France 24 reports Le Pen wasn’t alone in beating expectations Sunday. Overall voter turnout rates topped expectations as well.

 

“Despite fears that a lacklustre campaign combined with school holidays would lead to a historically low turnout, the French flocked to polls. Official results showed that the abstention rate in the first round at 5pm was around 19%. That abstention figure was only slightly higher than the score recorded in 2007.”

 

A writer for The Guardian says a failing economy has already doomed a series of political heavyweights — from Gordon Brown to Silvio Berlusconi. He writes Sarkozy could be next to fall.

 

“A victory for Hollande would not just be another run-of-the-mill ousting of any old European incumbent. It would be the victory of a Socialist, and in one of the two most important countries in Europe. That makes it an event with big potential consequences not just for France, where the left has been out of power for 17 years, but for Europe.”

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