(Image Source: The Guardian)

BY JUSTIN PROCHASKA

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

More than 15 months since their last meeting, world powers are meeting in Istanbul to discuss Iran’s controversial nuclear program. But unlike the previous meeting, leaders seem surprised. Why? The BBC reports talks seem to be going well.  

“We think it was a constructive atmosphere this morning shows we think things are going better. We are pretty satisfied with the way things are going this morning.”

The leaders of P5+1 — that’s the United Kingdom, United States, Germany, China, Russia and France — hope the talks can quell tensions about Tehran’s program, which they believe could be developing nuclear weapons. Iran’s chief foe, Israel, worries these weapons could lead to a Middle Eastern war. An EU policy chief told Euronews …

“What we are here to do is to find ways in which we can build confidence between us and ways in which we can demonstrate that Iran is moving away from a nuclear weapons programme”

Talks in January 2011 didn’t yield any agreement because Iran said its program wasn’t open to negotiation unless sanctions were lifted first. The P5+1 did not agree and the talks broke down. As the Sydney Times-Herald reports these talks are “progressing well” but reaching a deal might be unlikely.

“Diplomats said they did not expect an immediate deal, but they hoped the talks would open a path towards a diplomatic resolution of the Iranian nuclear crisis and avert the threat of a new war in the Middle East.”

Not everyone believes these talks will yield much progress. One political scientist said in an interview with Al Jazeera that even though Iran might be forced to give up its nuclear sites, it could still be a dangerous force.

“In few weeks time, in few months time Iran will resume nuclear programming from zero somewhere else.

Fareed Zakaria wrote in the Washington Post that the U.S. and its other allies should proceed with caution with the Iranians.

“But if Iran does make concessions, the United States would have to accept them and relax some sanctions. And this is where the second important group, Republicans in Washington, could be an obstacle. If they demagogue any deal, or refuse to reciprocate on sanctions, there will be no deal.”

If talks continue to improve, the Egyptian Gazette says there is a chance the sides could meet again, as soon as next month.
 

Leaders Say Talks With Iran 'Going Well'

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Apr 14, 2012

Leaders Say Talks With Iran 'Going Well'

 

(Image Source: The Guardian)

BY JUSTIN PROCHASKA

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

More than 15 months since their last meeting, world powers are meeting in Istanbul to discuss Iran’s controversial nuclear program. But unlike the previous meeting, leaders seem surprised. Why? The BBC reports talks seem to be going well.  

“We think it was a constructive atmosphere this morning shows we think things are going better. We are pretty satisfied with the way things are going this morning.”

The leaders of P5+1 — that’s the United Kingdom, United States, Germany, China, Russia and France — hope the talks can quell tensions about Tehran’s program, which they believe could be developing nuclear weapons. Iran’s chief foe, Israel, worries these weapons could lead to a Middle Eastern war. An EU policy chief told Euronews …

“What we are here to do is to find ways in which we can build confidence between us and ways in which we can demonstrate that Iran is moving away from a nuclear weapons programme”

Talks in January 2011 didn’t yield any agreement because Iran said its program wasn’t open to negotiation unless sanctions were lifted first. The P5+1 did not agree and the talks broke down. As the Sydney Times-Herald reports these talks are “progressing well” but reaching a deal might be unlikely.

“Diplomats said they did not expect an immediate deal, but they hoped the talks would open a path towards a diplomatic resolution of the Iranian nuclear crisis and avert the threat of a new war in the Middle East.”

Not everyone believes these talks will yield much progress. One political scientist said in an interview with Al Jazeera that even though Iran might be forced to give up its nuclear sites, it could still be a dangerous force.

“In few weeks time, in few months time Iran will resume nuclear programming from zero somewhere else.

Fareed Zakaria wrote in the Washington Post that the U.S. and its other allies should proceed with caution with the Iranians.

“But if Iran does make concessions, the United States would have to accept them and relax some sanctions. And this is where the second important group, Republicans in Washington, could be an obstacle. If they demagogue any deal, or refuse to reciprocate on sanctions, there will be no deal.”

If talks continue to improve, the Egyptian Gazette says there is a chance the sides could meet again, as soon as next month.
 

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