(Thumbnail Image: Radio Netherlands Wordwide)

Ousted Kyrgyzstan President Kurmanbek Bakiyev says he will retire if the interim government can guarantee his family's and his safety.

 

Bakiyev made the offer after he was given an ultimatum: turn yourself in, or be arrested.

Reports on the deal are mixed, but a government official says it can offer him safety. It is not clear whether that will save him from prosecution.

 

Bakiyev has offered to hold further negotiations in his southern hometown where he fled after demonstrations in the capital forced him to leave.  Al Jazeera visited him there.

"This strategy now of a defiant president out in the open surrounded by his most loyal supporters, calling almost on the interim government to try to come and take him away. ...And unless the new interim government in Bishkek acts decisively, they're in danger of losing the initiative."

 

A Russia Today correspondent reports that an earlier promise of security wasn't very popular with the Kyrgyz public.

"The interim government, headed by ex-foreign minister Roza Otunbayeva, earlier said that they would provide security to the president if he steps down, now they are saying that this policy may change due to wide disapproval from the public."

But Otunbayeva told reporters other options are being discussed, including how to get Bakiyev out of the country entirely. Here's CCTV.

"Everyone is calling on Bakiyev to leave the Kyrgyz people alone, for Bakiyev to find himself a place outside of Kyrgyzstan. Bakiyev as certainly raised the question 'what will I get in return?' This question is being discussed at the moment."

While some are asking what's next, others are wondering how it came to this. The Washington Post reports Russian television stations broadcast "scathing reports," less than a month before the bloody demonstrations.

"The media campaign, along with punishing economic measures adopted by the Kremlin, played a critical role in fanning public anger against Bakiyev and bringing people into the streets for the demonstrations that forced him to flee the capital."

Russia denies any involvement. A reporter on NBC's Nightly News gives his take on what drove people to the streets.

"They blame Bakiyev for years of corruption, of cronyism and the straw, which was a huge raising of utility prices which would especially hit people here hard. Over a third of the population is underneath the poverty line."

Russia hiked tariffs on energy supplies, driving up utility costs, supposedly in response to Bakyiev's foreign policy moves.

 

"In addition to the continuous U.S. military presence, Moscow was also miffed by Mr. Bakiyev's growing ties with Beijing, which brought Kyrgyzstan highway and railroad construction projects, investment, and Chinese access to natural resources." (Wall Street Journal)

 

Bakieyev was given less than 24 hours -- to turn himself in.

 

Writer: Erika Roberts

Producer: Newsy Staff

Kyrgyzstan President's Future Uncertain

by
0
Transcript
Apr 13, 2010

Kyrgyzstan President's Future Uncertain

(Thumbnail Image: Radio Netherlands Wordwide)

Ousted Kyrgyzstan President Kurmanbek Bakiyev says he will retire if the interim government can guarantee his family's and his safety.

 

Bakiyev made the offer after he was given an ultimatum: turn yourself in, or be arrested.

Reports on the deal are mixed, but a government official says it can offer him safety. It is not clear whether that will save him from prosecution.

 

Bakiyev has offered to hold further negotiations in his southern hometown where he fled after demonstrations in the capital forced him to leave.  Al Jazeera visited him there.

"This strategy now of a defiant president out in the open surrounded by his most loyal supporters, calling almost on the interim government to try to come and take him away. ...And unless the new interim government in Bishkek acts decisively, they're in danger of losing the initiative."

 

A Russia Today correspondent reports that an earlier promise of security wasn't very popular with the Kyrgyz public.

"The interim government, headed by ex-foreign minister Roza Otunbayeva, earlier said that they would provide security to the president if he steps down, now they are saying that this policy may change due to wide disapproval from the public."

But Otunbayeva told reporters other options are being discussed, including how to get Bakiyev out of the country entirely. Here's CCTV.

"Everyone is calling on Bakiyev to leave the Kyrgyz people alone, for Bakiyev to find himself a place outside of Kyrgyzstan. Bakiyev as certainly raised the question 'what will I get in return?' This question is being discussed at the moment."

While some are asking what's next, others are wondering how it came to this. The Washington Post reports Russian television stations broadcast "scathing reports," less than a month before the bloody demonstrations.

"The media campaign, along with punishing economic measures adopted by the Kremlin, played a critical role in fanning public anger against Bakiyev and bringing people into the streets for the demonstrations that forced him to flee the capital."

Russia denies any involvement. A reporter on NBC's Nightly News gives his take on what drove people to the streets.

"They blame Bakiyev for years of corruption, of cronyism and the straw, which was a huge raising of utility prices which would especially hit people here hard. Over a third of the population is underneath the poverty line."

Russia hiked tariffs on energy supplies, driving up utility costs, supposedly in response to Bakyiev's foreign policy moves.

 

"In addition to the continuous U.S. military presence, Moscow was also miffed by Mr. Bakiyev's growing ties with Beijing, which brought Kyrgyzstan highway and railroad construction projects, investment, and Chinese access to natural resources." (Wall Street Journal)

 

Bakieyev was given less than 24 hours -- to turn himself in.

 

Writer: Erika Roberts

Producer: Newsy Staff

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3