(Image Source: BBC)

 

BY JOE DEUTSCHMANN

ANCHOR CARISSA LOETHEN

 

You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy.

 

North Korean president Kim Jong Un surprised the world on Sunday with his first televised speech. KTVU has the story.

“Kim Jong Un spoke during festivities celebrating what would have been the 100th birthday his grandfather and the country’s founder, Kim Il Sung...he became leader last December when his father, Kim Jong Il, died.”

The young leader’s rhetoric stuck close to the line used by the his predecessors. Al Jazeera has the translation.

“We must strengthen our people’s army at all costs in order to show the world our dignity as military-first North Korea and build a strong socialist nation.”

That’s right: Military first. But by addressing the public, Kim has also shown himself to be a different kind of leader than his father, who reportedly only spoke publicly on one occasion. A writer for the Wall Street Journal says:

“Mr. Kim took his latest step to create a public image that is more like his grandfather, who could be gregarious in public settings, than his father, who was more reserved and whose voice was broadcast only once. In his public appearances, Mr. Kim has often been seen hugging and walking arm-in-arm with people.”

In the speech, Kim said the country’s dignity was more important than peace. But a BBC correspondent says there’s a third issue that’s even more pressing to the country than dignity: food shortages.

“...there’s always been this image that North Korea’s caught between its need for military strength and its need for food aid...”

The U.S. had agreed to give food aid to North Korea provided Kim put a moratorium on nuclear missile testing, but cancelled the agreement over last week’s failed rocket launch. A writer for The Korea Times says — that’s about all the international community can do.

“North Korea will attempt to reassert itself with another provocation, most likely a nuclear test. Until the Chinese lose patience with their wayward client state, there's little the outside world can do in the way of sanctions and condemnations that it hasn't done already.”

The Associate Press reported that, at China’s request, the U.S. and South Korea are showing restraint in their responses to the rocket and the speech.

 

 

 

Kim Jong Un Gives First Speech, Emphasizes Military

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Apr 16, 2012

Kim Jong Un Gives First Speech, Emphasizes Military

(Image Source: BBC)

 

BY JOE DEUTSCHMANN

ANCHOR CARISSA LOETHEN

 

You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy.

 

North Korean president Kim Jong Un surprised the world on Sunday with his first televised speech. KTVU has the story.

“Kim Jong Un spoke during festivities celebrating what would have been the 100th birthday his grandfather and the country’s founder, Kim Il Sung...he became leader last December when his father, Kim Jong Il, died.”

The young leader’s rhetoric stuck close to the line used by the his predecessors. Al Jazeera has the translation.

“We must strengthen our people’s army at all costs in order to show the world our dignity as military-first North Korea and build a strong socialist nation.”

That’s right: Military first. But by addressing the public, Kim has also shown himself to be a different kind of leader than his father, who reportedly only spoke publicly on one occasion. A writer for the Wall Street Journal says:

“Mr. Kim took his latest step to create a public image that is more like his grandfather, who could be gregarious in public settings, than his father, who was more reserved and whose voice was broadcast only once. In his public appearances, Mr. Kim has often been seen hugging and walking arm-in-arm with people.”

In the speech, Kim said the country’s dignity was more important than peace. But a BBC correspondent says there’s a third issue that’s even more pressing to the country than dignity: food shortages.

“...there’s always been this image that North Korea’s caught between its need for military strength and its need for food aid...”

The U.S. had agreed to give food aid to North Korea provided Kim put a moratorium on nuclear missile testing, but cancelled the agreement over last week’s failed rocket launch. A writer for The Korea Times says — that’s about all the international community can do.

“North Korea will attempt to reassert itself with another provocation, most likely a nuclear test. Until the Chinese lose patience with their wayward client state, there's little the outside world can do in the way of sanctions and condemnations that it hasn't done already.”

The Associate Press reported that, at China’s request, the U.S. and South Korea are showing restraint in their responses to the rocket and the speech.

 

 

 

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