(Image source: Alphonce Shiundu/Daily Nation)

BY LORA VLAEVA
ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

 

With a presidential election coming up March 4, Kenyan voters got their first chance to watch the candidates debate.


“Kenya’s first ever live televised debate between presidential candidates has started. The discussion is centered on the issues of governance, health, education and security.” (Video via BBC)

The event was broadcast on eight television stations and 34 radio stations, as well as made available live on YouTube. Millions of Kenyans watched the debate and asked direct questions to the candidates. (via The Guardian)

No fewer than eight candidates are running for the office, but Prime Minister Raila Odinga and his Deputy Uhuru Kenyatta are currently leading the polls, despite Kenyatta facing charges for crimes against humanity. (Pictures via Wikimedia Commons/Daily Nation)

CNN reports Kenyatta is accused of participating in the killing of more than a 1,000 people after the last elections in 2007, which led to ethnic violence.

When questioned, Kenyatta denied the charges and insisted the International Criminal Court’s investigation would not prevent him from running the country. (Video via KTN)

If Kenyatta is elected, he would face strong International opposition. France and the UK have recently said they would limit their contact with a president facing charges from the ICC, statements Kenyan officials weren’t happy with.

“Foreign Affairs Minister Moses Wetangula summoned ambassadors from the EU countries to relay the government displeasure of a statements made last week by some Eu countries.” (Video via NTVKenya)

Every presidential election since 1992 has seen an outbreak of violence in the country. But with the debate comes the hope the upcoming elections might, for the first time, break away from ethnic loyalty and courts of personality. Al Jazeera has some promising numbers.

“Polls have suggested the debate could influence a group of swing voters who make up 5 or 10 percents of the electorate. For the first time in this campaign, the minor candidates will be getting equal billing with the leading candidates.”

If no candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, a series of runoff elections are expected.

Kenyan Voters Watch First Live Presidential Debate

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Feb 11, 2013

Kenyan Voters Watch First Live Presidential Debate

(Image source: Alphonce Shiundu/Daily Nation)

BY LORA VLAEVA
ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

 

With a presidential election coming up March 4, Kenyan voters got their first chance to watch the candidates debate.


“Kenya’s first ever live televised debate between presidential candidates has started. The discussion is centered on the issues of governance, health, education and security.” (Video via BBC)

The event was broadcast on eight television stations and 34 radio stations, as well as made available live on YouTube. Millions of Kenyans watched the debate and asked direct questions to the candidates. (via The Guardian)

No fewer than eight candidates are running for the office, but Prime Minister Raila Odinga and his Deputy Uhuru Kenyatta are currently leading the polls, despite Kenyatta facing charges for crimes against humanity. (Pictures via Wikimedia Commons/Daily Nation)

CNN reports Kenyatta is accused of participating in the killing of more than a 1,000 people after the last elections in 2007, which led to ethnic violence.

When questioned, Kenyatta denied the charges and insisted the International Criminal Court’s investigation would not prevent him from running the country. (Video via KTN)

If Kenyatta is elected, he would face strong International opposition. France and the UK have recently said they would limit their contact with a president facing charges from the ICC, statements Kenyan officials weren’t happy with.

“Foreign Affairs Minister Moses Wetangula summoned ambassadors from the EU countries to relay the government displeasure of a statements made last week by some Eu countries.” (Video via NTVKenya)

Every presidential election since 1992 has seen an outbreak of violence in the country. But with the debate comes the hope the upcoming elections might, for the first time, break away from ethnic loyalty and courts of personality. Al Jazeera has some promising numbers.

“Polls have suggested the debate could influence a group of swing voters who make up 5 or 10 percents of the electorate. For the first time in this campaign, the minor candidates will be getting equal billing with the leading candidates.”

If no candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, a series of runoff elections are expected.

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