(Image source: Gawker)

BY BRICE SANDER


There’s an old saying that goes, when the economy rises, so do women’s hemlines. But now, USA Today suggests a lift in hemlines isn’t the only way to tell if the economy’s on the upswing.

“Plastic surgery numbers may not be perfect economic indicators – but they are going in the same upward direction as the stock market and employment rate, after falling during the recession … Americans got about 1.6 million cosmetic procedures in 2011, the second year of increase after a big drop in 2009...”

The numbers come from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons’ annual report. Health Aim runs through 2011’s most popular procedures — and a few declines.

“Breast implants increased by 4 percent, liposuction rose by 1 percent, and facelifts up by 5 percent. There are some procedures that experienced drops as well. Nose jobs dropped by 3 percent and eyelid surgeries by 6 percent.”

Non-surgical procedures, like Botox and facial fillers, weren’t included in those numbers, but more people are reportedly requesting those, too.  Gawker looks into the increase.

“… it’s not just the economy, stupid. Many procedures have become less expensive and more finely tuned, which means a much lower chance that you'll end up looking like Jocelyn Wildenstein, [the cat lady]. Of course, surgeries still haven't hit the heights of 2005's Golden Plastic Age, when Americans endured a whopping 2.1 million surgeries.”

The Society suggests an increase in information on social media sites is leading more people to go under the knife. Media Bistro finds that a little funny.  

“So if you’re considering getting a little Botox, Angelina’s lips or some brand new ears, there is certainly a huge wealth of information on Twitter, like plastic surgery-related accounts and your friend’s opinions. Just be sure you don’t make a decision to go under the knife based on what you heard in 140 characters.”

But the Associated Press found an even more probable cause for the rise in plastic surgery rates — aging baby boomers seeking the fountain of youth.

Jump in Plastic Surgery Rates Linked to Improving Economy

by Brice Sander
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Transcript
Feb 13, 2012

Jump in Plastic Surgery Rates Linked to Improving Economy

 

(Image source: Gawker)

BY BRICE SANDER


There’s an old saying that goes, when the economy rises, so do women’s hemlines. But now, USA Today suggests a lift in hemlines isn’t the only way to tell if the economy’s on the upswing.

“Plastic surgery numbers may not be perfect economic indicators – but they are going in the same upward direction as the stock market and employment rate, after falling during the recession … Americans got about 1.6 million cosmetic procedures in 2011, the second year of increase after a big drop in 2009...”

The numbers come from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons’ annual report. Health Aim runs through 2011’s most popular procedures — and a few declines.

“Breast implants increased by 4 percent, liposuction rose by 1 percent, and facelifts up by 5 percent. There are some procedures that experienced drops as well. Nose jobs dropped by 3 percent and eyelid surgeries by 6 percent.”

Non-surgical procedures, like Botox and facial fillers, weren’t included in those numbers, but more people are reportedly requesting those, too.  Gawker looks into the increase.

“… it’s not just the economy, stupid. Many procedures have become less expensive and more finely tuned, which means a much lower chance that you'll end up looking like Jocelyn Wildenstein, [the cat lady]. Of course, surgeries still haven't hit the heights of 2005's Golden Plastic Age, when Americans endured a whopping 2.1 million surgeries.”

The Society suggests an increase in information on social media sites is leading more people to go under the knife. Media Bistro finds that a little funny.  

“So if you’re considering getting a little Botox, Angelina’s lips or some brand new ears, there is certainly a huge wealth of information on Twitter, like plastic surgery-related accounts and your friend’s opinions. Just be sure you don’t make a decision to go under the knife based on what you heard in 140 characters.”

But the Associated Press found an even more probable cause for the rise in plastic surgery rates — aging baby boomers seeking the fountain of youth.

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