(Image Source: Twitter / @wikileaks)

BY ADNAN S. KHAN



How does a world-famous whistleblower spend time while under house arrest? Apparently, starting a campaign for senate in his home country. KMGH has the headline.

“WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange … plans to run for a seat in the Australian senate. This … as he faces criminal charges in Sweden.”

The official WikiLeaks Twitter announced the story with this Tweet, along with a series of questions on whether the campaign was even possible.

Turns out it is. Assange can run for the Australian Senate — while under house arrest in the U.K. — for criminal charges he faces in Sweden. Australia’s The Age explains how Assange has found something of a loophole in Australian law.

“People convicted of a crime under Australian law that is punishable by a year's prison term or more are excluded from office, but the constitution is silent on the impact of any potential conviction abroad. It disqualifies anyone deemed '’attainted of treason'’.”

WikiLeaks Central explained its rational -- in detail -- on its website. It went on to compare Assange to other political figures who were charged with a crime and still got elected, quoting an article on an Australian government Web site.

“In November 1962, South African activist Nelson Mandela was jailed for five years for incitement and leaving the country without a passport. In 1964, a sentence of life imprisonment for sabotage (an offence similar to treason) was added. In 1990, after years of political negotiations, he was freed from jail, and in 1994 was elected President of South Africa.”

Mandela comparison aside — this news took many in the media by surprise. Mediaite even questions the authenticity of the WikiLeaks Tweet.

“…there seem to be no signs that the Wikileaks account was hacked, especially in light of the fact that articles suggesting this may happen in the future have been written and the account asked for legal help from Twitter regarding whether a run would be possible.”

Digital Journal reports Assange plans to support candidates running against incumbent Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard in the Australian state of Victoria. The Journal adds …

“It may be recalled that Gillard had blasted Assange for Wikileaks’ release of classified documents particularly those of the US diplomatic cables, which she called ‘grossly irresponsible.’”

The Associated Press reports Assange could snatch as much as four percent of the vote. But his chances for anything beyond seem slim -- according to Al Jazeera

“Any adult Australian citizen can run for parliament, but few succeed without the backing of a major political party. Only one of Australia's 76 current senators does not represent a party.”

Australian elections are set for 2013. Assange has not yet announced which state he will run in.

 

 

Julian Assange Planning Run for Australian Senate

by Adnan Khan
0
Transcript
Mar 18, 2012

Julian Assange Planning Run for Australian Senate

 

 

(Image Source: Twitter / @wikileaks)

BY ADNAN S. KHAN



How does a world-famous whistleblower spend time while under house arrest? Apparently, starting a campaign for senate in his home country. KMGH has the headline.

“WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange … plans to run for a seat in the Australian senate. This … as he faces criminal charges in Sweden.”

The official WikiLeaks Twitter announced the story with this Tweet, along with a series of questions on whether the campaign was even possible.

Turns out it is. Assange can run for the Australian Senate — while under house arrest in the U.K. — for criminal charges he faces in Sweden. Australia’s The Age explains how Assange has found something of a loophole in Australian law.

“People convicted of a crime under Australian law that is punishable by a year's prison term or more are excluded from office, but the constitution is silent on the impact of any potential conviction abroad. It disqualifies anyone deemed '’attainted of treason'’.”

WikiLeaks Central explained its rational -- in detail -- on its website. It went on to compare Assange to other political figures who were charged with a crime and still got elected, quoting an article on an Australian government Web site.

“In November 1962, South African activist Nelson Mandela was jailed for five years for incitement and leaving the country without a passport. In 1964, a sentence of life imprisonment for sabotage (an offence similar to treason) was added. In 1990, after years of political negotiations, he was freed from jail, and in 1994 was elected President of South Africa.”

Mandela comparison aside — this news took many in the media by surprise. Mediaite even questions the authenticity of the WikiLeaks Tweet.

“…there seem to be no signs that the Wikileaks account was hacked, especially in light of the fact that articles suggesting this may happen in the future have been written and the account asked for legal help from Twitter regarding whether a run would be possible.”

Digital Journal reports Assange plans to support candidates running against incumbent Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard in the Australian state of Victoria. The Journal adds …

“It may be recalled that Gillard had blasted Assange for Wikileaks’ release of classified documents particularly those of the US diplomatic cables, which she called ‘grossly irresponsible.’”

The Associated Press reports Assange could snatch as much as four percent of the vote. But his chances for anything beyond seem slim -- according to Al Jazeera

“Any adult Australian citizen can run for parliament, but few succeed without the backing of a major political party. Only one of Australia's 76 current senators does not represent a party.”

Australian elections are set for 2013. Assange has not yet announced which state he will run in.

 

 

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