(Image source: U.S. National Archives)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS 

 

 

Remember that time Jimmy Carter almost socked another world leader?

 

In this corner: He’s an 89-year-old peanut farmer turned U.S. president. Carter tells South Africa’s Sunday Times during a visit to Cape Town in 2002: “I almost got in a fight with the president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, because he was refusing to let AIDS be treated. … That’s the closest I’ve come to getting into a fistfight with a head of state.” (Via Sunday Times)

 

Mbeki is a good 18 years younger than Carter. He had rejected foreign grants to treat AIDS in his country, even denying the scientific validity of treatments for the disease. (Via World Economic ForumJohn Akec South Sudan)

 

So the man who boasts his administration never started a conflict narrowly avoided launching his own attack on foreign soil, but only because he lacks the fiery temperament of the many prominent politicos who have turned disagreement into violent disarray.

 

Like this, from the Czech Republic. (Via CBS)

 

Or the brawl that broke out in Ukraine’s parliament during a debate over a controversial minority languages bill. A similar scene played out in 2010, with the House speaker taking cover from rotten eggs. (Via RT)

 

Many of these fights, including a 2011 bout in Italy, are partly due to the worldwide financial crisis.

 

“The strain is starting to show among its politicians, who’ve been at each other’s throats, quite literally.” (Via Euronews)

 

It’s enough to make you appreciate the relatively civilized tone of political discourse in the U.S. Sort of. (Via The Atlantic)

Jimmy Carter's Near-Fistfight and Other Political Brawls

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Nov 3, 2013

Jimmy Carter's Near-Fistfight and Other Political Brawls

(Image source: U.S. National Archives)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS 

 

 

Remember that time Jimmy Carter almost socked another world leader?

 

In this corner: He’s an 89-year-old peanut farmer turned U.S. president. Carter tells South Africa’s Sunday Times during a visit to Cape Town in 2002: “I almost got in a fight with the president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, because he was refusing to let AIDS be treated. … That’s the closest I’ve come to getting into a fistfight with a head of state.” (Via Sunday Times)

 

Mbeki is a good 18 years younger than Carter. He had rejected foreign grants to treat AIDS in his country, even denying the scientific validity of treatments for the disease. (Via World Economic ForumJohn Akec South Sudan)

 

So the man who boasts his administration never started a conflict narrowly avoided launching his own attack on foreign soil, but only because he lacks the fiery temperament of the many prominent politicos who have turned disagreement into violent disarray.

 

Like this, from the Czech Republic. (Via CBS)

 

Or the brawl that broke out in Ukraine’s parliament during a debate over a controversial minority languages bill. A similar scene played out in 2010, with the House speaker taking cover from rotten eggs. (Via RT)

 

Many of these fights, including a 2011 bout in Italy, are partly due to the worldwide financial crisis.

 

“The strain is starting to show among its politicians, who’ve been at each other’s throats, quite literally.” (Via Euronews)

 

It’s enough to make you appreciate the relatively civilized tone of political discourse in the U.S. Sort of. (Via The Atlantic)

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