(Image source: Space.com / AGI)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

The international community reacted Sunday to North Korea’s latest plans for a rocket launch this month — and the nation’s regional neighbors are none too pleased.

 

Although North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un announced the rocket launch as another attempt to lift a satellite into space South Korea, the United States and Japan were quick to label it a ballistics missile launch meant to test the reach of nuclear warheads. [Video: BBC]

 

Japan’s foreign minister issued an order Sunday to shoot down the rocket if North Korea’s test goes ahead as scheduled. NHK News reports Japan’s military began deploying the necessary ground-to-air missile launchers on its coast Sunday afternoon.

 

The last North Korean missile test, in April, failed just one minute into its launch. As this simulation on Space.com shows, it ended up as scattered debris just off the nation’s east coast.

 

Which leaves observers to wonder why, after such little time for technological development, is North Korea trying yet again?

 

Australia’s ABC reports the launch is likely to occur around Dec. 17, the first anniversary of former leader Kim Jong-Il’s death — meaning the test could be meant to memorialize a man who spent much of North Korea’s scarce resources on similar large-scale weaponry.

 

But the test also coincides with the South Korean presidential election. Financial Times reports the launch could disrupt the process “by putting the spotlight on the candidates’ policies towards the North.”

 

North Korea also drew a response from its only regional ally, China.

 

But the far east super power’s new government didn’t exactly offer warm words for North Korea, telling its neighbor it has the right to send a satellite into outer space but shouldn’t defy United Nations regulations by testing a ballistics missile. China’s state-run Xinhua news agency said:

 

“China hopes all parties concerned can act in a way that is more conducive to the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and can exercise calmness so as to avoid further escalation of the situation...”

 

The rocket launch is set to occur sometime between Dec. 10 and 22.

Japan Threatens to Shoot Down North Korean Rocket

by Zach Toombs
1
Transcript
Dec 2, 2012

Japan Threatens to Shoot Down North Korean Rocket

(Image source: Space.com / AGI)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

The international community reacted Sunday to North Korea’s latest plans for a rocket launch this month — and the nation’s regional neighbors are none too pleased.

 

Although North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un announced the rocket launch as another attempt to lift a satellite into space South Korea, the United States and Japan were quick to label it a ballistics missile launch meant to test the reach of nuclear warheads. [Video: BBC]

 

Japan’s foreign minister issued an order Sunday to shoot down the rocket if North Korea’s test goes ahead as scheduled. NHK News reports Japan’s military began deploying the necessary ground-to-air missile launchers on its coast Sunday afternoon.

 

The last North Korean missile test, in April, failed just one minute into its launch. As this simulation on Space.com shows, it ended up as scattered debris just off the nation’s east coast.

 

Which leaves observers to wonder why, after such little time for technological development, is North Korea trying yet again?

 

Australia’s ABC reports the launch is likely to occur around Dec. 17, the first anniversary of former leader Kim Jong-Il’s death — meaning the test could be meant to memorialize a man who spent much of North Korea’s scarce resources on similar large-scale weaponry.

 

But the test also coincides with the South Korean presidential election. Financial Times reports the launch could disrupt the process “by putting the spotlight on the candidates’ policies towards the North.”

 

North Korea also drew a response from its only regional ally, China.

 

But the far east super power’s new government didn’t exactly offer warm words for North Korea, telling its neighbor it has the right to send a satellite into outer space but shouldn’t defy United Nations regulations by testing a ballistics missile. China’s state-run Xinhua news agency said:

 

“China hopes all parties concerned can act in a way that is more conducive to the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and can exercise calmness so as to avoid further escalation of the situation...”

 

The rocket launch is set to occur sometime between Dec. 10 and 22.

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