(Image Source: 20th Century Fox)

 

BY LUKE LEONARD

 

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


James Cameron’s blockbuster film Titanic was released for a second time Wednesday- this time, in 3D. The 18 million dollar conversion took even more time than it did to originally film the movie. CBS News spoke to Cameron leading up to the re-release.

“It took 300 artists working at workstations for over a year, about 60 weeks, to literally outline every object every character every feature on every face and do it for every frame.”

The original release in 1997 attracted movie-goers to the cinemas-- sometimes multiple occasions-- to watch gripping romance unfold . But will the same audiences now a decade older choose to see it again as it returns to the big screen? A writer for Capital New York thinks there’s reason to...

“Titanic 3-D’s audiences won't be there because they want to see the film again. They’ll be there because they want to experience something from the past, to recapture or revise the original experience of watching the film.”

But some film critics and blogs are suggesting the 3D release may just be a ploy to make more money from the already second-highest grossing film of all time. A contributor for The Green Bay Press Gazette says...

“The fact that it’s being reissued to coincide with the 100th anniversary, it seems more like commercialization of a tragic event and playing the 3-D card in order to make extra income. That may make it a nonevent, and maybe it’ll just do the same numbers as ’Star Wars.’”

Regardless, the question is- what does 3D bring to the table for audiences? A writer for Philly.com argues only certain films are suitable for 3D.

“The hues of "Titanic," by comparison, do not lend themselves to 3-D. I spent an hour flipping the glasses up and down, comparing the images, and with the glasses on, what you see on screen is murkier. Everything loses a little definition, a little life.”

Cameron broke box office records in 2009 with his sci-fi action 3D extravaganza, Avatar. So- a writer for New York Daily News says adding another dimension to the already momentous Titanic is doing exactly what Cameron is best at.

“Cameron is in his element steering us through the eye-popping, pulse-pounding final hour. He never loses his way amidst the now even more spectacular spectacle.”

You can catch Titanic 3-D in cinemas as of April 4th.

Is 'Titanic 3D' Just a Money Grab?

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Apr 5, 2012

Is 'Titanic 3D' Just a Money Grab?

(Image Source: 20th Century Fox)

 

BY LUKE LEONARD

 

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


James Cameron’s blockbuster film Titanic was released for a second time Wednesday- this time, in 3D. The 18 million dollar conversion took even more time than it did to originally film the movie. CBS News spoke to Cameron leading up to the re-release.

“It took 300 artists working at workstations for over a year, about 60 weeks, to literally outline every object every character every feature on every face and do it for every frame.”

The original release in 1997 attracted movie-goers to the cinemas-- sometimes multiple occasions-- to watch gripping romance unfold . But will the same audiences now a decade older choose to see it again as it returns to the big screen? A writer for Capital New York thinks there’s reason to...

“Titanic 3-D’s audiences won't be there because they want to see the film again. They’ll be there because they want to experience something from the past, to recapture or revise the original experience of watching the film.”

But some film critics and blogs are suggesting the 3D release may just be a ploy to make more money from the already second-highest grossing film of all time. A contributor for The Green Bay Press Gazette says...

“The fact that it’s being reissued to coincide with the 100th anniversary, it seems more like commercialization of a tragic event and playing the 3-D card in order to make extra income. That may make it a nonevent, and maybe it’ll just do the same numbers as ’Star Wars.’”

Regardless, the question is- what does 3D bring to the table for audiences? A writer for Philly.com argues only certain films are suitable for 3D.

“The hues of "Titanic," by comparison, do not lend themselves to 3-D. I spent an hour flipping the glasses up and down, comparing the images, and with the glasses on, what you see on screen is murkier. Everything loses a little definition, a little life.”

Cameron broke box office records in 2009 with his sci-fi action 3D extravaganza, Avatar. So- a writer for New York Daily News says adding another dimension to the already momentous Titanic is doing exactly what Cameron is best at.

“Cameron is in his element steering us through the eye-popping, pulse-pounding final hour. He never loses his way amidst the now even more spectacular spectacle.”

You can catch Titanic 3-D in cinemas as of April 4th.

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