(Image source: Chosun Ilbo)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The satellite launched into orbit by North Korea this week may or may not fall out of the sky sometime in the next few months, depending on who you ask.

U.S. officials say they believe the North Koreans have failed to communicate with the satellite, and that it could be tumbling out of control. CNN’s Barbara Starr explains. (Video via euronews)

“Some key things that should have happened — sending some radio signals to control the satellite from a ground station — have not yet happened. … They’re going to have to keep watch for several days on this satellite.”

But at least one country with a stake in North Korea’s actions reports the satellite entered orbit just fine — South Korea. Fox News has more.

“The South Koreans, however, put out a conflicting account this morning saying that it appears the North Koreans do have control of the satellite. Meanwhile, the South Koreans are continuing to retrieve debris from the long-range rocket.”

South Korea says the satellite is in a stable orbit, with no danger of plummeting to earth.

But Al Jazeera reports the South Koreans do agree the North didn’t get everything right. The satellite doesn’t seem to be broadcasting anything. Here’s the satellite control chief. (Video via CBS News)

“Immortal revolutionary hymns, Song of General Kim Il-sung and Song of General Kim Jong-il, from our satellite echo in space.”
“If they do, South Korea’s defense ministry can’t hear them.”


It should become clear over the next few days whether the satellite really is going rogue. If it turns out the North Koreans really don’t have control, the satellite poses at least two threats, according to NPR.

“The orbit could decay, bringing the satellite crashing down through the atmosphere, or it could just keep tumbling up there and eventually collide with another satellite. A collision would increase the amount of space junk in orbit that other spacecraft have to dodge.”

The AFP reports North Korean leader Kim Jong-un issued a statement Friday morning saying the country needs to launch even more satellites.

Is North Korea's New Satellite Out of Control?

by Steven Sparkman
0
Transcript
Dec 13, 2012

Is North Korea's New Satellite Out of Control?

 

(Image source: Chosun Ilbo)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The satellite launched into orbit by North Korea this week may or may not fall out of the sky sometime in the next few months, depending on who you ask.

U.S. officials say they believe the North Koreans have failed to communicate with the satellite, and that it could be tumbling out of control. CNN’s Barbara Starr explains. (Video via euronews)

“Some key things that should have happened — sending some radio signals to control the satellite from a ground station — have not yet happened. … They’re going to have to keep watch for several days on this satellite.”

But at least one country with a stake in North Korea’s actions reports the satellite entered orbit just fine — South Korea. Fox News has more.

“The South Koreans, however, put out a conflicting account this morning saying that it appears the North Koreans do have control of the satellite. Meanwhile, the South Koreans are continuing to retrieve debris from the long-range rocket.”

South Korea says the satellite is in a stable orbit, with no danger of plummeting to earth.

But Al Jazeera reports the South Koreans do agree the North didn’t get everything right. The satellite doesn’t seem to be broadcasting anything. Here’s the satellite control chief. (Video via CBS News)

“Immortal revolutionary hymns, Song of General Kim Il-sung and Song of General Kim Jong-il, from our satellite echo in space.”
“If they do, South Korea’s defense ministry can’t hear them.”


It should become clear over the next few days whether the satellite really is going rogue. If it turns out the North Koreans really don’t have control, the satellite poses at least two threats, according to NPR.

“The orbit could decay, bringing the satellite crashing down through the atmosphere, or it could just keep tumbling up there and eventually collide with another satellite. A collision would increase the amount of space junk in orbit that other spacecraft have to dodge.”

The AFP reports North Korean leader Kim Jong-un issued a statement Friday morning saying the country needs to launch even more satellites.

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