(Image source: SlashGear)

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

Does the Internet need more Google? Rumor has it the search giant is looking at a third-party commenting platform.

A source tells The Next Web building Google functionality into third-party sites would allow Google’s bots to index and track comments across the web. It would continue Google’s efforts to unify its offerings and draw attention to its Google Plus social network.

Google would be stepping on some big toes — Facebook already has a comment system that works more or less the same way. But VentureBeat says, if Google’s offering works right it could be an upgrade.

“One big downside to the Facebook commenting system is that you can only use a Facebook account to login. If Google’s system allows you to get around that by logging in with several different third-party accounts, it could have a huge leg up.”

SlashGear points out — it benefits the users, but it’s good for Google’s business, too.

“With Google+ powered comments, the feedback could be indexed and come up in relevant searches… Obviously it’s in Google’s best interests to be the hub of online discourse, and it could also benefit from tracking where Google+ users comment online.”

CNET says that’s the social information goldmine Google is desperate to track and understand.

“Facebook and Twitter, to Google's chagrin, don't let the search engine index their updates and tweets. A huge quantity of very personal words are arriving on those sites, but it's effectively unknown to Google unless somebody links to a particular comment on an indexed Web site.”

But, as ReadWriteWeb points out — whether vendors get on board is another matter.

“Yes, the Google+ notification box is a hook, but it only reaches as many people as Google+ does. Publishers might want to hedge their bets this way instead of only allowing users of one social network to comment.”

Still, Marketing Pilgrim says a Google commenting system would be a little late to the party, and a tired-old user grab to boot.


“Maybe I am getting numb to Google’s efforts to get people to use Google+. Everything they are doing is designed to force that hub into the many spokes it already has. It’s interesting to watch in the same way that people rubberneck a car accident.”

The tech blogs have asked Google about its plans, but it looks like Google has yet to, uh, comment.
 

Is Google Mulling Web-Wide Comments?

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Mar 28, 2012

Is Google Mulling Web-Wide Comments?

(Image source: SlashGear)

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

Does the Internet need more Google? Rumor has it the search giant is looking at a third-party commenting platform.

A source tells The Next Web building Google functionality into third-party sites would allow Google’s bots to index and track comments across the web. It would continue Google’s efforts to unify its offerings and draw attention to its Google Plus social network.

Google would be stepping on some big toes — Facebook already has a comment system that works more or less the same way. But VentureBeat says, if Google’s offering works right it could be an upgrade.

“One big downside to the Facebook commenting system is that you can only use a Facebook account to login. If Google’s system allows you to get around that by logging in with several different third-party accounts, it could have a huge leg up.”

SlashGear points out — it benefits the users, but it’s good for Google’s business, too.

“With Google+ powered comments, the feedback could be indexed and come up in relevant searches… Obviously it’s in Google’s best interests to be the hub of online discourse, and it could also benefit from tracking where Google+ users comment online.”

CNET says that’s the social information goldmine Google is desperate to track and understand.

“Facebook and Twitter, to Google's chagrin, don't let the search engine index their updates and tweets. A huge quantity of very personal words are arriving on those sites, but it's effectively unknown to Google unless somebody links to a particular comment on an indexed Web site.”

But, as ReadWriteWeb points out — whether vendors get on board is another matter.

“Yes, the Google+ notification box is a hook, but it only reaches as many people as Google+ does. Publishers might want to hedge their bets this way instead of only allowing users of one social network to comment.”

Still, Marketing Pilgrim says a Google commenting system would be a little late to the party, and a tired-old user grab to boot.


“Maybe I am getting numb to Google’s efforts to get people to use Google+. Everything they are doing is designed to force that hub into the many spokes it already has. It’s interesting to watch in the same way that people rubberneck a car accident.”

The tech blogs have asked Google about its plans, but it looks like Google has yet to, uh, comment.
 

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