(Image source: News Indonesia Source)

BY DANNY MATTESON

ANCHOR NEVILLE MILLER


Why do people love using their cellphones so much? Turns out it’s a disease. Well, not exactly, but it is contagious.

That’s according to a University of Michigan study that found cell phone users are more likely to check their texts, tweets, etc., after seeing someone around them do the same.

Researchers studied the phenomenon by observing pairs of students in dining halls and coffee shops. They broke the pairs’ behavior down into 10-second intervals and found that subjects used their phones in about 24% of those intervals.

In the 10-second intervals immediately after one of the students used their phone, however, cell phone used increased greatly — with their companions using their phones almost 40% of the time.

And the team points out that it’s not just coincidence. One researcher told Live Science ….

"Some of this could be people being primed to check their e-mail or phone messages, but this contagious use was happening several times in a 15-minute interaction."

The study also noted that their observations may be due to the effects of social inclusion and exclusion and may not be the same in different age groups.

It was published in the June 2012 edition of Human Ethology Bulletin.

And if it’s not a disease it may be an addiction. As Mashable reported in November a Pew Research Study showed that 29% of people say they can’t live without their cellphones.

Is Cell Phone Use Contagious?

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Dec 3, 2012

Is Cell Phone Use Contagious?

(Image source: News Indonesia Source)

BY DANNY MATTESON

ANCHOR NEVILLE MILLER


Why do people love using their cellphones so much? Turns out it’s a disease. Well, not exactly, but it is contagious.

That’s according to a University of Michigan study that found cell phone users are more likely to check their texts, tweets, etc., after seeing someone around them do the same.

Researchers studied the phenomenon by observing pairs of students in dining halls and coffee shops. They broke the pairs’ behavior down into 10-second intervals and found that subjects used their phones in about 24% of those intervals.

In the 10-second intervals immediately after one of the students used their phone, however, cell phone used increased greatly — with their companions using their phones almost 40% of the time.

And the team points out that it’s not just coincidence. One researcher told Live Science ….

"Some of this could be people being primed to check their e-mail or phone messages, but this contagious use was happening several times in a 15-minute interaction."

The study also noted that their observations may be due to the effects of social inclusion and exclusion and may not be the same in different age groups.

It was published in the June 2012 edition of Human Ethology Bulletin.

And if it’s not a disease it may be an addiction. As Mashable reported in November a Pew Research Study showed that 29% of people say they can’t live without their cellphones.

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