(Image source: CBS)


BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

CBS producers are stirring up the reality TV scene with a new show called “The Job.”

 

The show gives people from around the country a chance to win positions at top companies like Epic Records, LiveNation and Cosmopolitan magazine. Each week, five new candidates compete for their dream job while going through numerous elimination challenges.

 

Pretty standard reality television plot. But The New York Post’s Maureen Callahan says that’s the problem, explaining contestants are competing for middle-class jobs, not the usual super star status quo you might see on other shows like American Idol and The Voice.

The Post calls the show “offensive.”


“‘The Job’ turns this massive human toll into spectacle, dangling the prospect of an unspecified mid-level position in front of desperate contestants, who degrade themselves by telling their most pathetic personal histories in the paradoxical quest to regain some dignity.”

 

According to a 2012 report at employment changes between lower, middle and higher wage jobs from 2008-2010—

 

and while lower-wage occupations were 21% of recession losses, more than half (58%) were part of recovery growth.

…while mid-wage occupations only accounted for 22% of recovery growth.

 

But producer Mark Burnett —who helped develop the aggressive plot of Survivor—says he believes the series portrays a kinder approach on television, and is nothing like American Idol which make contestants look “foolish.”

 

“I just don’t think that watching public humiliation is cool (anymore) … Humiliating people seems spiteful … You can make good TV without that. The Job is great TV without making anybody look bad.

 


And The Job’s executive producer told CNN it should encourage companies to take a new approach to hiring.

 

“Beyond experience and qualifications for a job and the ability to communicate is just character ... that character came through in the obstacles that people overcame in challenges on the show.”

 


So will the challenges be relevant to the job? or spiked with enough ridiculous tasks and drama to fill the entertainment status? The producers aren’t giving too much away in the teasers, but you’ll be able to see for yourself when the premier airs on February 15.
 

 

Is CBS’ New Reality Show 'The Job' Offensive?

by Logan Tittle
1
Transcript
Feb 3, 2013

Is CBS’ New Reality Show 'The Job' Offensive?

(Image source: CBS)


BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

CBS producers are stirring up the reality TV scene with a new show called “The Job.”

 

The show gives people from around the country a chance to win positions at top companies like Epic Records, LiveNation and Cosmopolitan magazine. Each week, five new candidates compete for their dream job while going through numerous elimination challenges.

 

Pretty standard reality television plot. But The New York Post’s Maureen Callahan says that’s the problem, explaining contestants are competing for middle-class jobs, not the usual super star status quo you might see on other shows like American Idol and The Voice.

The Post calls the show “offensive.”


“‘The Job’ turns this massive human toll into spectacle, dangling the prospect of an unspecified mid-level position in front of desperate contestants, who degrade themselves by telling their most pathetic personal histories in the paradoxical quest to regain some dignity.”

 

According to a 2012 report at employment changes between lower, middle and higher wage jobs from 2008-2010—

 

and while lower-wage occupations were 21% of recession losses, more than half (58%) were part of recovery growth.

…while mid-wage occupations only accounted for 22% of recovery growth.

 

But producer Mark Burnett —who helped develop the aggressive plot of Survivor—says he believes the series portrays a kinder approach on television, and is nothing like American Idol which make contestants look “foolish.”

 

“I just don’t think that watching public humiliation is cool (anymore) … Humiliating people seems spiteful … You can make good TV without that. The Job is great TV without making anybody look bad.

 


And The Job’s executive producer told CNN it should encourage companies to take a new approach to hiring.

 

“Beyond experience and qualifications for a job and the ability to communicate is just character ... that character came through in the obstacles that people overcame in challenges on the show.”

 


So will the challenges be relevant to the job? or spiked with enough ridiculous tasks and drama to fill the entertainment status? The producers aren’t giving too much away in the teasers, but you’ll be able to see for yourself when the premier airs on February 15.
 

 

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