(Thumbnail: Press TV)

 

"What's happening is unprecedented. This is the most significant challenge the Islamic Republic, this hard-line regime, is facing." (CNN's Reza Sayah)

 

At least eight are dead and hundreds more arrested in the wake of the latest anti-government protests in Iran.

Yet harsh government crackdowns haven’t stopped speculation that the country and its leaders are at a crossroads.

Iranian unrest has been simmering since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s controversial reelection in June.

But it wasn’t until mid-December that the unrest resurfaced in full force.

The BBC brings us up to speed with a timeline.

- On December 19th, dissident Cleric Ayatollah Montazeri dies at age 87
- Two days later, tens of thousands attend his funeral, where supporters and security forces clash
- December 24th- Iran reportedly places restrictions on further memorial services for Montazeri
- December 26th- Clashes are reported in central and northern Tehran
- And on December 27th, the Shiite holiday of Ashura, anti-government protests came to a head as the bloodiest demonstrations in the country since June.


Analysis in the UK’s The Guardian suggests the protests symbolize growing distaste—in particular—for the republic built by the late Ayatollah Khomeini.

“What's changing, as the battle lines sharpen, is that fantasy politics and paranoid posturing can no longer conceal the widening fissures – economic, social and ethnic as well as political – that are splintering Iranian society.”

Much like the post-election violence of June and July, protestors are spreading the word via social networking.

Al Jazeera English offers an interpretation.

“It would be difficult to ignore claims on Web sites that clashes have spread beyond Tehran to major cities like Espajon… These latest images appear to show the opposition movement is very much alive.”

Not only is it alive, says commentator Robin Wright for The Times Online, but the opposition might be on its way to ending Iranian dictatorship.

“…the emergence of people power is also setting a new precedent in the last bloc of countries ruled by authoritarian regimes…This is the most vibrant and imaginative civil disobedience campaign in the world.”

So what do you make of these latest protests in Iran?  What do they mean for the country’s future stability?  
 
 

Iran Protests Seen to Threaten Regime

by Christina Hartman
0
Transcript
Dec 29, 2009

Iran Protests Seen to Threaten Regime

(Thumbnail: Press TV)

 

"What's happening is unprecedented. This is the most significant challenge the Islamic Republic, this hard-line regime, is facing." (CNN's Reza Sayah)

 

At least eight are dead and hundreds more arrested in the wake of the latest anti-government protests in Iran.

Yet harsh government crackdowns haven’t stopped speculation that the country and its leaders are at a crossroads.

Iranian unrest has been simmering since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s controversial reelection in June.

But it wasn’t until mid-December that the unrest resurfaced in full force.

The BBC brings us up to speed with a timeline.

- On December 19th, dissident Cleric Ayatollah Montazeri dies at age 87
- Two days later, tens of thousands attend his funeral, where supporters and security forces clash
- December 24th- Iran reportedly places restrictions on further memorial services for Montazeri
- December 26th- Clashes are reported in central and northern Tehran
- And on December 27th, the Shiite holiday of Ashura, anti-government protests came to a head as the bloodiest demonstrations in the country since June.


Analysis in the UK’s The Guardian suggests the protests symbolize growing distaste—in particular—for the republic built by the late Ayatollah Khomeini.

“What's changing, as the battle lines sharpen, is that fantasy politics and paranoid posturing can no longer conceal the widening fissures – economic, social and ethnic as well as political – that are splintering Iranian society.”

Much like the post-election violence of June and July, protestors are spreading the word via social networking.

Al Jazeera English offers an interpretation.

“It would be difficult to ignore claims on Web sites that clashes have spread beyond Tehran to major cities like Espajon… These latest images appear to show the opposition movement is very much alive.”

Not only is it alive, says commentator Robin Wright for The Times Online, but the opposition might be on its way to ending Iranian dictatorship.

“…the emergence of people power is also setting a new precedent in the last bloc of countries ruled by authoritarian regimes…This is the most vibrant and imaginative civil disobedience campaign in the world.”

So what do you make of these latest protests in Iran?  What do they mean for the country’s future stability?  
 
 

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