(Image Source: BBC)

BY EMILY ALLEN

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

 

The International Criminal Court came out with its first verdict today since it was set up a decade ago.  It found Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga guilty of enlisting child soldiers.  Here’s some background on Lubanga from the BBC and euronews.

“He actively went to the homes and the households and asked them to donate cash or a cow or a child to the war effort.  And he was also shown in court on a video galvanizing child soldiers.”

“Tens of thousands of people died in the fighting that raged across several countries in central Africa.  The use of child soldiers less than 15 was a particularly tragic aspect of the war.”

It took two and a half years for the court to finally crank out a verdict.  A CNN reporter points out it’s the first case to focus specifically on the issue of child soldiers — saying it sends a message to child soldier recruiters around the world.

“It is a war crime to use child soldiers.  The definition of that is any child under 15 years old.  Monita, it also sets a legal precedent too because there are bigger fish than this man.” 

An international law professor told Al Jazeera one of the ICC’s biggest challenges is picking which criminals it will go after. And he said it doesn’t have a very convincing explanation of how it makes those choices.

“Some of the criticism is focus on Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the chief prosecutor, for focusing on African countries and avoiding places like Afghanistan, Gaza, Iraq and Columbia.”

The ICC’s list includes 11 suspects who are still at large. At the top of the list is Joseph Kony, the focus of a highly viewed YouTube video that recently went viral.  Amnesty International says politics has gotten in the way of bringing these suspects to justice.

“We see this in the case of Joseph Kony of course his story has been all over the internet as we know and yet despite opportunities to arrest him by Uganda, the Central African Republic and Central Africa, he’s not been arrested.”

Lubanga could face life in prison. But according to MSNBC a sentence won’t be delivered immediately.  Lubanga will have thirty days to file an appeal.

International Criminal Court Hands Out First Verdict Ever

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Mar 14, 2012

International Criminal Court Hands Out First Verdict Ever

(Image Source: BBC)

BY EMILY ALLEN

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

 

The International Criminal Court came out with its first verdict today since it was set up a decade ago.  It found Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga guilty of enlisting child soldiers.  Here’s some background on Lubanga from the BBC and euronews.

“He actively went to the homes and the households and asked them to donate cash or a cow or a child to the war effort.  And he was also shown in court on a video galvanizing child soldiers.”

“Tens of thousands of people died in the fighting that raged across several countries in central Africa.  The use of child soldiers less than 15 was a particularly tragic aspect of the war.”

It took two and a half years for the court to finally crank out a verdict.  A CNN reporter points out it’s the first case to focus specifically on the issue of child soldiers — saying it sends a message to child soldier recruiters around the world.

“It is a war crime to use child soldiers.  The definition of that is any child under 15 years old.  Monita, it also sets a legal precedent too because there are bigger fish than this man.” 

An international law professor told Al Jazeera one of the ICC’s biggest challenges is picking which criminals it will go after. And he said it doesn’t have a very convincing explanation of how it makes those choices.

“Some of the criticism is focus on Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the chief prosecutor, for focusing on African countries and avoiding places like Afghanistan, Gaza, Iraq and Columbia.”

The ICC’s list includes 11 suspects who are still at large. At the top of the list is Joseph Kony, the focus of a highly viewed YouTube video that recently went viral.  Amnesty International says politics has gotten in the way of bringing these suspects to justice.

“We see this in the case of Joseph Kony of course his story has been all over the internet as we know and yet despite opportunities to arrest him by Uganda, the Central African Republic and Central Africa, he’s not been arrested.”

Lubanga could face life in prison. But according to MSNBC a sentence won’t be delivered immediately.  Lubanga will have thirty days to file an appeal.

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