(Image source: Mashable)

 
BY TATIANA DARIE

Not just a factory but a city with fast-food restaurants, cafes, grocery stores and sports facilities.
That’s how Apple’s Chinese supplier Foxconn’s factory is described by NPR’s China correspondent Rob Schmitz. Schmitz took a look inside- to see how the iPad is made...

 

“Here a machine attaches a tiny buckle to the motherboard, if anything goes wrong with this particular ipad Apple use this buckle to trace the machine back to this line on this date...”

 

According to Fortune, Schmitz is the first public media reporter and only the second journalist after ABC's Bill Weir to gain access to the Foxconn factory floor.  Some say this is a step forward for Apple’s transparency. Wired reports...
 

“Schmitz’s reporting is neither glowing nor inflammatory but does add to the minuscule first-hand information about Foxconn from disinterested sources...”
 
With all the latest rumors swirling around Apple’s Chinese workers some question whether making iPads in China is as bad as the Western media makes it out to be. 

 

“Many workers laughed, telling me it’s not really that bad....”

 

The video comes after This American Life aired a story about working conditions inside the Foxconn plant called “Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory” back in January. The US public-radio show has retracted his report saying the author, Mike Daisey, fabricated some of the details...

 

“And I'm coming to you today to say something that I've never had to say on our program. Two months ago, we broadcast a story that we’ve come to believe is not true. And the most powerful and memorable moments in the story all seem to be fabricated.”

 

Although he has his regrets, Mike Daisey is defending his story. He writes on his blog...

 

“I stand by my work. My show is a theatrical piece whose goal is to create a human connection between our gorgeous devices and the brutal circumstances from which they emerge...”

 

Almost 250,000 people work at Foxconn -- and nearly 50,000 live on the campus in shared dorm rooms. 

 

 

 

 

Inside Look at Foxconn Contradicts Earlier Reports

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Apr 13, 2012

Inside Look at Foxconn Contradicts Earlier Reports

(Image source: Mashable)

 
BY TATIANA DARIE

Not just a factory but a city with fast-food restaurants, cafes, grocery stores and sports facilities.
That’s how Apple’s Chinese supplier Foxconn’s factory is described by NPR’s China correspondent Rob Schmitz. Schmitz took a look inside- to see how the iPad is made...

 

“Here a machine attaches a tiny buckle to the motherboard, if anything goes wrong with this particular ipad Apple use this buckle to trace the machine back to this line on this date...”

 

According to Fortune, Schmitz is the first public media reporter and only the second journalist after ABC's Bill Weir to gain access to the Foxconn factory floor.  Some say this is a step forward for Apple’s transparency. Wired reports...
 

“Schmitz’s reporting is neither glowing nor inflammatory but does add to the minuscule first-hand information about Foxconn from disinterested sources...”
 
With all the latest rumors swirling around Apple’s Chinese workers some question whether making iPads in China is as bad as the Western media makes it out to be. 

 

“Many workers laughed, telling me it’s not really that bad....”

 

The video comes after This American Life aired a story about working conditions inside the Foxconn plant called “Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory” back in January. The US public-radio show has retracted his report saying the author, Mike Daisey, fabricated some of the details...

 

“And I'm coming to you today to say something that I've never had to say on our program. Two months ago, we broadcast a story that we’ve come to believe is not true. And the most powerful and memorable moments in the story all seem to be fabricated.”

 

Although he has his regrets, Mike Daisey is defending his story. He writes on his blog...

 

“I stand by my work. My show is a theatrical piece whose goal is to create a human connection between our gorgeous devices and the brutal circumstances from which they emerge...”

 

Almost 250,000 people work at Foxconn -- and nearly 50,000 live on the campus in shared dorm rooms. 

 

 

 

 

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