Some Icelanders are serious about halting the construction of a highway for reasons many outside would find laughable — hidden elves.

"Now that project is on hold until the supreme court weighs in. The environmental group called Friends of Lava say the project would destroy the elves' land." (Via WQAD)

Members of Friends of Lava have made it clear their concern is not just elves but the environment, as the construction plans run straight through a lava field, which would destroy plants and bird's nests. (Via RUV)

But the wide-ranging belief in elves is deeply rooted in the county's traditions.

"A survey conducted a few years ago found that more than 60 percent of people in Iceland believe in elves." (Via CLTV)

Believers claim there is even an invisible elf church hidden in the lava formations, and one woman who says she can see it claims if the road is built, and the elves don't agree it was completely necessary, there will be consequences.

"'Very bad things' might happen. 'This elf church is connected by light energy to other churches, other places. ... So, if one of them is destroyed, it’s, uh, well, it’s not a good thing.'" (Via The Atlantic

Icelanders claim the elves live similarly to humans and aren't like Santa's little helpers. They're also not part of the Keebler clan.

Apparently, only those with psychic powers can see the elves, but many other residents still believe — possibly because of the island's unique natural phenomena. (Via Slate)

Because of Iceland's position on the mid-Atlantic ridge, the country is active with volcanoes, earthquakes and high winds. The northern lights can also be seen. (Via Maps of World

 

 

If the highway does turn out to be an important and necessary avenue, some believers say the elves will just quietly move out of the area.

Icelanders Worry Highway Project Could Displace Elves

by Jasmine Bailey
1
Transcript
Dec 24, 2013

Icelanders Worry Highway Project Could Displace Elves

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons / Ustas)

BY Jasmine Bailey

Some Icelanders are serious about halting the construction of a highway for reasons many outside would find laughable — hidden elves.

"Now that project is on hold until the supreme court weighs in. The environmental group called Friends of Lava say the project would destroy the elves' land." (Via WQAD)

Members of Friends of Lava have made it clear their concern is not just elves but the environment, as the construction plans run straight through a lava field, which would destroy plants and bird's nests. (Via RUV)

But the wide-ranging belief in elves is deeply rooted in the county's traditions.

"A survey conducted a few years ago found that more than 60 percent of people in Iceland believe in elves." (Via CLTV)

Believers claim there is even an invisible elf church hidden in the lava formations, and one woman who says she can see it claims if the road is built, and the elves don't agree it was completely necessary, there will be consequences.

"'Very bad things' might happen. 'This elf church is connected by light energy to other churches, other places. ... So, if one of them is destroyed, it’s, uh, well, it’s not a good thing.'" (Via The Atlantic

Icelanders claim the elves live similarly to humans and aren't like Santa's little helpers. They're also not part of the Keebler clan.

Apparently, only those with psychic powers can see the elves, but many other residents still believe — possibly because of the island's unique natural phenomena. (Via Slate)

Because of Iceland's position on the mid-Atlantic ridge, the country is active with volcanoes, earthquakes and high winds. The northern lights can also be seen. (Via Maps of World

 

 

If the highway does turn out to be an important and necessary avenue, some believers say the elves will just quietly move out of the area.

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