(Image source: MSNBC)

BY KERRY LEARY
ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

Those who were concerned that the HPV virus could lead to promiscuity in teenage girls... have no fear. According to a new study, the HPV vaccine doesn’t spur teenage sex.

“We're talking about the HPV vaccine that protects young people against cervical cancer. Researchers compared medical records for 1400 vaccinated and unvaccinated girls.”

The research found girls who had the vaccine weren’t any more likely to be sexually active than those who didn’t receive it. But USA Today spoke with a doctor who notes the studies are based on self-reporting, which, according to the doctor, isn’t very reliable. To confirm the study’s results, he attempted to approach the data from a different angle.

“His study of 1,398 girls, ages 11 and 12, analyzed medical data from the Kaiser Permanente Georgia managed-care group … For the analysis, [the doctor] and colleagues examined ‘clinical markers of sexual activity’ — pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease infections and contraceptive counseling — for two groups of preteen girls for up to three years.”

But the research came to similar conclusions to the original study-- promiscuity isn’t a factor in heightened sexual activity. Medical News Today notes where the original concern came from regarding the relationship between promiscuity and the HPV shot.

“The main worry is that girls who are vaccinated may feel extra protected and will consequently become more sexually active. Another concern is that some girls might mistakenly believe that they cannot get pregnant or acquire any type of STI.”

WTIC spoke with a doctor about the virus. “It's recommended that all girls in the US ages 11 and 12 get vaccinated … The virus is so common, according to the CDC, at least 50 percent of sexually active men and women are infected at some point in their lives.”

The New York Times spoke with a family doctor who tells skeptical parents to think of the vaccination no differently than wearing a helmet to ride a bike.

HPV Vaccine Doesn't Increase Sexual Activity in Teens: Study

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Oct 15, 2012

HPV Vaccine Doesn't Increase Sexual Activity in Teens: Study

(Image source: MSNBC)

BY KERRY LEARY
ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

Those who were concerned that the HPV virus could lead to promiscuity in teenage girls... have no fear. According to a new study, the HPV vaccine doesn’t spur teenage sex.

“We're talking about the HPV vaccine that protects young people against cervical cancer. Researchers compared medical records for 1400 vaccinated and unvaccinated girls.”

The research found girls who had the vaccine weren’t any more likely to be sexually active than those who didn’t receive it. But USA Today spoke with a doctor who notes the studies are based on self-reporting, which, according to the doctor, isn’t very reliable. To confirm the study’s results, he attempted to approach the data from a different angle.

“His study of 1,398 girls, ages 11 and 12, analyzed medical data from the Kaiser Permanente Georgia managed-care group … For the analysis, [the doctor] and colleagues examined ‘clinical markers of sexual activity’ — pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease infections and contraceptive counseling — for two groups of preteen girls for up to three years.”

But the research came to similar conclusions to the original study-- promiscuity isn’t a factor in heightened sexual activity. Medical News Today notes where the original concern came from regarding the relationship between promiscuity and the HPV shot.

“The main worry is that girls who are vaccinated may feel extra protected and will consequently become more sexually active. Another concern is that some girls might mistakenly believe that they cannot get pregnant or acquire any type of STI.”

WTIC spoke with a doctor about the virus. “It's recommended that all girls in the US ages 11 and 12 get vaccinated … The virus is so common, according to the CDC, at least 50 percent of sexually active men and women are infected at some point in their lives.”

The New York Times spoke with a family doctor who tells skeptical parents to think of the vaccination no differently than wearing a helmet to ride a bike.

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