(Image Source: WorldIPV6Launch.org)

 

BY LEAH BECERRA

 

Today is the day that the new web standard IPv6 saves the internet from shutting down. If this is the first time you’re hearing about this phenomenon, Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist has a pretty good explanation.

 

“There are already 5.5 Billion mobiles in the world, if they all had internet addresses it would exhaust instantly the IP version 4 address space. Which as I said before has only 4.3 billion addresses.”

 

IPv4 was launched in 1983 as an experiment, so it’s no wonder the amount of users was never expected to outgrow 4.3 billion. IPv6 will make sure user space is never outgrown, and the internet isn’t forced to a standstill. This new IP version allows a lot more space for Internet users. How much more gets a little, well, number-ey. CNN money explains.

 

“Silly-sounding huge number alert: The Internet's address book grew from "just" 4.3 billion unique addresses to 340 undecillion (that's 340 trillion trillion trillion). That's a growth factor of 79 octillion (billion billion billion).”

 

The Herald Sun reports — not only is the Internet going to be a lot larger, but IPv6 will also make the Internet a much safer place.

 

“...the new protocol system – IPv6 – comes with a security code known as IPSEC that would do away with anonymity on the web. If enacted globally, this would make it easier to catch cyber criminals...”

 

Everything sounds pretty great in terms of the new IPv6 launch, but CNET points out the reality of switching from the old to the new version isn’t as simple as many businesses would hope.

 

“No cross-compatibility or effective workarounds exist between the two address formats. That means that until a central mass of Internet activity transfers to IPv6, there will still be a need for IPv4. Some have suggested that the complete transition to IPv6 may take three to five years (some suggest it may take decades).”

 

So, today – codenamed World IPv6 Day – is the day businesses, web hosts and equipment manufacturers are encouraged to start switching versions. For everyone else, don’t worry, the Internet is saved until further notice.

How IPv6 'Saved the Internet'

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Jun 6, 2012

How IPv6 'Saved the Internet'

(Image Source: WorldIPV6Launch.org)

 

BY LEAH BECERRA

 

Today is the day that the new web standard IPv6 saves the internet from shutting down. If this is the first time you’re hearing about this phenomenon, Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist has a pretty good explanation.

 

“There are already 5.5 Billion mobiles in the world, if they all had internet addresses it would exhaust instantly the IP version 4 address space. Which as I said before has only 4.3 billion addresses.”

 

IPv4 was launched in 1983 as an experiment, so it’s no wonder the amount of users was never expected to outgrow 4.3 billion. IPv6 will make sure user space is never outgrown, and the internet isn’t forced to a standstill. This new IP version allows a lot more space for Internet users. How much more gets a little, well, number-ey. CNN money explains.

 

“Silly-sounding huge number alert: The Internet's address book grew from "just" 4.3 billion unique addresses to 340 undecillion (that's 340 trillion trillion trillion). That's a growth factor of 79 octillion (billion billion billion).”

 

The Herald Sun reports — not only is the Internet going to be a lot larger, but IPv6 will also make the Internet a much safer place.

 

“...the new protocol system – IPv6 – comes with a security code known as IPSEC that would do away with anonymity on the web. If enacted globally, this would make it easier to catch cyber criminals...”

 

Everything sounds pretty great in terms of the new IPv6 launch, but CNET points out the reality of switching from the old to the new version isn’t as simple as many businesses would hope.

 

“No cross-compatibility or effective workarounds exist between the two address formats. That means that until a central mass of Internet activity transfers to IPv6, there will still be a need for IPv4. Some have suggested that the complete transition to IPv6 may take three to five years (some suggest it may take decades).”

 

So, today – codenamed World IPv6 Day – is the day businesses, web hosts and equipment manufacturers are encouraged to start switching versions. For everyone else, don’t worry, the Internet is saved until further notice.

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