(Image source: Digital Trends)



BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

 

The House of Representatives was supposed to vote on the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act on Friday. But the vote got bumped to Thursday, and lawmakers passed the bill 248-168.

Techdirt reports CISPA passed with new amendments that increase the applicable scope of the bill: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals and protection of children.

This comes on top of CISPA’s existing leeway to sift through online content. CNET explains.

“Some say its powers are too broad, giving the government the ability to snoop through medical records, private emails, online financial documents — all without a warrant or limits.”

And under CISPA, the government need not stop at knowing what you’re doing online. Wired says the bill makes it much easier for ISPs to pass along personally identifying information, as well.

“An ISP is not required to shield any personally identifying data of its customers when it believes it has detected threats… In short, the measure seeks to undo privacy laws that generally forbid ISPs from disclosing customer communications with anybody else unless with a court order.”

In a statement, ACLU legal counsel Michelle Richardson criticized the bill as overreaching, and expressed concern over the sacrifice of privacy for security.

“‘Cybersecurity does not have to mean abdication of Americans’ online privacy. As we’ve seen repeatedly, once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there’s no going back. We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity.’”

For its part, The White House has issued a veto threat, saying CISPA doesn’t do enough to protect privacy.

“Legislation should address core critical infrastructure vulnerabilities without sacrificing the fundamental values of privacy and civil liberties for our citizens, especially at a time our Nation is facing challenges to our economic well-being and national security.”

The vote in the House split mostly along party lines. Before the bill goes to President Obama’s desk it will have to clear the Democrat-controlled Senate.
 

House Fast-Tracks, Approves CISPA

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Apr 27, 2012

House Fast-Tracks, Approves CISPA

(Image source: Digital Trends)



BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

 

The House of Representatives was supposed to vote on the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act on Friday. But the vote got bumped to Thursday, and lawmakers passed the bill 248-168.

Techdirt reports CISPA passed with new amendments that increase the applicable scope of the bill: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals and protection of children.

This comes on top of CISPA’s existing leeway to sift through online content. CNET explains.

“Some say its powers are too broad, giving the government the ability to snoop through medical records, private emails, online financial documents — all without a warrant or limits.”

And under CISPA, the government need not stop at knowing what you’re doing online. Wired says the bill makes it much easier for ISPs to pass along personally identifying information, as well.

“An ISP is not required to shield any personally identifying data of its customers when it believes it has detected threats… In short, the measure seeks to undo privacy laws that generally forbid ISPs from disclosing customer communications with anybody else unless with a court order.”

In a statement, ACLU legal counsel Michelle Richardson criticized the bill as overreaching, and expressed concern over the sacrifice of privacy for security.

“‘Cybersecurity does not have to mean abdication of Americans’ online privacy. As we’ve seen repeatedly, once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there’s no going back. We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity.’”

For its part, The White House has issued a veto threat, saying CISPA doesn’t do enough to protect privacy.

“Legislation should address core critical infrastructure vulnerabilities without sacrificing the fundamental values of privacy and civil liberties for our citizens, especially at a time our Nation is facing challenges to our economic well-being and national security.”

The vote in the House split mostly along party lines. Before the bill goes to President Obama’s desk it will have to clear the Democrat-controlled Senate.
 

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