(Image source: CNN)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

Big supermarket chains in the UK and Ireland have been forced to withdraw several meat products after traces of horse DNA were found in products claiming to contain only beef.

 

“After carrying out tests on 27 beef burgers the Food Safety Authority of Ireland found 37% contained horse DNA …  And 85% tested positive for pig DNA.”

(Sky News)

 

CNN reports the burgers came from two meat processing plants in Ireland and one in Britain.

 

Chief executive of the Irish food authority said traces of pig DNA could be explainable as “...meat from different animals is processed at the same plants. But he said there was no ‘clear explanation at this time’ for the presence of the horsemeat.”

 

Officials have said the presence of various meat poses no risk to public health—but that isn’t everyone’s main concern. Instead, some people are looking at this as a cultural issue.

 

“Do I find it acceptable to be eating horses? I’d rather not. I'd like to know if I was. If you buy something labelled beef you want beef in it.”

(STV)

 

The companies involved in the mixed meat incident have faced ethical issues like this before. Silvercrest Foods, one of the processing plants under investigation, is owned by Atlantic Beef Products Inc.

 

ABP’s president was recently charged under the federal Meat Inspection Act for making misleading statements to an official during routine inspections concerning the slaughtering of an animal.

 

The Daily Business Buzz explains an inspection official noticed an animal being unloaded was limping and “looked emaciated.” When the veterinarian recommended the animal “not go through the normal avenue for slaughter … employees disagreed with the inspector’s assessment” and went through with the usual process anway. This resulted in the animal not being used at all and a $2,500 fine.

 

Two third-party suppliers in the Netherlands and Spain who supplied beef-based ingredient products to the distributor are reportedly being investigated as well as the two meat processing plants in Ireland and Britain.

 

 

Horse Meat Found in U.K. Hamburger

by Logan Tittle
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Transcript
Jan 16, 2013

Horse Meat Found in U.K. Hamburger

(Image source: CNN)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

Big supermarket chains in the UK and Ireland have been forced to withdraw several meat products after traces of horse DNA were found in products claiming to contain only beef.

 

“After carrying out tests on 27 beef burgers the Food Safety Authority of Ireland found 37% contained horse DNA …  And 85% tested positive for pig DNA.”

(Sky News)

 

CNN reports the burgers came from two meat processing plants in Ireland and one in Britain.

 

Chief executive of the Irish food authority said traces of pig DNA could be explainable as “...meat from different animals is processed at the same plants. But he said there was no ‘clear explanation at this time’ for the presence of the horsemeat.”

 

Officials have said the presence of various meat poses no risk to public health—but that isn’t everyone’s main concern. Instead, some people are looking at this as a cultural issue.

 

“Do I find it acceptable to be eating horses? I’d rather not. I'd like to know if I was. If you buy something labelled beef you want beef in it.”

(STV)

 

The companies involved in the mixed meat incident have faced ethical issues like this before. Silvercrest Foods, one of the processing plants under investigation, is owned by Atlantic Beef Products Inc.

 

ABP’s president was recently charged under the federal Meat Inspection Act for making misleading statements to an official during routine inspections concerning the slaughtering of an animal.

 

The Daily Business Buzz explains an inspection official noticed an animal being unloaded was limping and “looked emaciated.” When the veterinarian recommended the animal “not go through the normal avenue for slaughter … employees disagreed with the inspector’s assessment” and went through with the usual process anway. This resulted in the animal not being used at all and a $2,500 fine.

 

Two third-party suppliers in the Netherlands and Spain who supplied beef-based ingredient products to the distributor are reportedly being investigated as well as the two meat processing plants in Ireland and Britain.

 

 

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