(Image Source: New York Times)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE

With the conclusion of Tuesday’s election, the 113th U.S. Congress will have more female senators than ever before. CNN has more.

“There are a record number of women, or at least will be in the next Senate. So there will be 19 females in the Senate, so less than 20 percent of the Senate … ”

NBC News reports Democrats will hold onto a small majority in the Senate.  They credit the supposed “War on Women” for energizing Democrats and women voters to break the record of 17 women-held senate seats set during the last election. Some of the notable winners in close races include: 

Harvard Law Professor Elizabeth Warren, who bested Senator Scott Brown to become the first female senator of Massachusetts. Wisconsin’s Tammy Baldwin — who won a tight race to become the first openly gay senator. And the incumbent Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill, who was expected to lose her seat until opponent Todd Akin made controversial comments about rape that drew national attention. 
 
The victories for female senators may also have contributed to President Obama’s re-election. A writer for The Hill says Mr. Obama “maintained a broad advantage among female voters, which was more than enough to overcome a deficit among men.” 

According to Bloomberg“Women have been making steady gains since the election of 1992, dubbed the Year of the Woman, when there were seven women in the U.S. Senate. Even so, in state legislatures that provide a pipeline to higher office, gains have been slower. Female representation stands at 24 percent, just three percentage points higher than two decades ago … ” 

Despite the good news of the broken record, the disparity between men and women in Congress still in large part exists. The Senate is now made up of roughly 20 percent women, but the U.S. population is roughly 50 percent. 

Historic Number of Women in U.S. Senate

by John O'Connor
0
Sources:CNNThe Hill
Transcript
Nov 7, 2012

Historic Number of Women in U.S. Senate

 

(Image Source: New York Times)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE

With the conclusion of Tuesday’s election, the 113th U.S. Congress will have more female senators than ever before. CNN has more.

“There are a record number of women, or at least will be in the next Senate. So there will be 19 females in the Senate, so less than 20 percent of the Senate … ”

NBC News reports Democrats will hold onto a small majority in the Senate.  They credit the supposed “War on Women” for energizing Democrats and women voters to break the record of 17 women-held senate seats set during the last election. Some of the notable winners in close races include: 

Harvard Law Professor Elizabeth Warren, who bested Senator Scott Brown to become the first female senator of Massachusetts. Wisconsin’s Tammy Baldwin — who won a tight race to become the first openly gay senator. And the incumbent Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill, who was expected to lose her seat until opponent Todd Akin made controversial comments about rape that drew national attention. 
 
The victories for female senators may also have contributed to President Obama’s re-election. A writer for The Hill says Mr. Obama “maintained a broad advantage among female voters, which was more than enough to overcome a deficit among men.” 

According to Bloomberg“Women have been making steady gains since the election of 1992, dubbed the Year of the Woman, when there were seven women in the U.S. Senate. Even so, in state legislatures that provide a pipeline to higher office, gains have been slower. Female representation stands at 24 percent, just three percentage points higher than two decades ago … ” 

Despite the good news of the broken record, the disparity between men and women in Congress still in large part exists. The Senate is now made up of roughly 20 percent women, but the U.S. population is roughly 50 percent. 

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