(Image source: Hermann M. Niemeyer)

 

 

BY JASMINE BAILEY

 

 

New findings show the struggle with nicotine has been around for more than 1,000 years — much longer than previously thought. This was revealed after historians tested the hair of Chilean mummies.

 

It was originally thought that Chilean shamans used substances, including tobacco, to connect to the gods and spirits, and that it was exclusively used by the upper class as opposed to the majority of the population. (Via CN Healthy Nation)

 

This discovery not only refutes how many people were using tobacco; it also challenges the idea that smoking tobacco only lasted a short time before the natives switched to snuffing, or sniffing, hallucinogens. (Via YouTube / Goofragous)

 

So how did this recent discovery change the beliefs of historians?

 

It suggests class didn’t play as much of a role in nicotine use as previously thought. They realized this when the traces of nicotine in the mummies’ hair didn’t coincide with the value of the objects at their burial sites. (Via Chileno.co.uk )

 

Fifty-six well-preserved mummies were examined along with the types of objects they were buried with — many of which were indicative of the mummies’ social and wealth status. (Via Journal of Archaeological Science)

 

Researchers discovered the stimulant in the hair of 35 of the 56 mummies. One archaeologist said “The finding of nicotine was definitely unexpected” because past records show smoking pipes were eventually replaced exclusively with snuffing. (Via LiveScience)

 

A complete description of the findings will be published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Hair of Ancient Mummies Shows Nicotine Use

by Jasmine Bailey
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Transcript
Jun 29, 2013

Hair of Ancient Mummies Shows Nicotine Use

(Image source: Hermann M. Niemeyer)

 

 

BY JASMINE BAILEY

 

 

New findings show the struggle with nicotine has been around for more than 1,000 years — much longer than previously thought. This was revealed after historians tested the hair of Chilean mummies.

 

It was originally thought that Chilean shamans used substances, including tobacco, to connect to the gods and spirits, and that it was exclusively used by the upper class as opposed to the majority of the population. (Via CN Healthy Nation)

 

This discovery not only refutes how many people were using tobacco; it also challenges the idea that smoking tobacco only lasted a short time before the natives switched to snuffing, or sniffing, hallucinogens. (Via YouTube / Goofragous)

 

So how did this recent discovery change the beliefs of historians?

 

It suggests class didn’t play as much of a role in nicotine use as previously thought. They realized this when the traces of nicotine in the mummies’ hair didn’t coincide with the value of the objects at their burial sites. (Via Chileno.co.uk )

 

Fifty-six well-preserved mummies were examined along with the types of objects they were buried with — many of which were indicative of the mummies’ social and wealth status. (Via Journal of Archaeological Science)

 

Researchers discovered the stimulant in the hair of 35 of the 56 mummies. One archaeologist said “The finding of nicotine was definitely unexpected” because past records show smoking pipes were eventually replaced exclusively with snuffing. (Via LiveScience)

 

A complete description of the findings will be published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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