(Thumbnail Image: BBC)


"Those quiet, stay at home protests in Greece, they just got a little out of hand here. ... The protesters are protesting social cuts to get the budget in order, cuts like raising the retirement age a little more than a year or two." (CNBC)

Greeks began a two-day protest of the strict austerity measures proposed by the government to pay for the bailout from the IMF and EU. The plan includes higher taxes and public sector wage cuts.

 

A report on the BBC shows how some angry teachers delivered their message.

"A group of teachers invaded the studios of state television and disrupted a discussion program with the education minister. They refused to leave the building until they were allowed to broadcast their message live. They said the government decision to sack 17,000 part-time teachers as part of the austerity measures would lead to education standards being lowered."


A full-blown strike has yet to materialize, and because of that, a Guardian blog says the dramatic descriptions and images from the protests appear to be all hype.

"There is little to indicate a grassroots uprising beyond the occasional truck with loudspeakers telling citizens 'it's time again for revolution' and protesters draping banners over the Acropolis, saying 'peoples of Europe, rise up'. Few in Greece appear to be heeding the advice on the banner."

David Ignatius of The Washington Post says austerity doesn't fit with Greece's image.

"It goes against the free wheeling, boisterous national spirit that makes Greece such a delightful place to visit  and such a nightmare for finance ministers from the more uptight, less spendthrift countries of northern Europe."


An economist talking to Russia Today says the blame lies with the Greek government and with U.S. banks for hiding the debt.

"The Greek governments, and this includes governments going back to 2002, have been aided and abetted by especially Goldman Sachs who designed special derivatives to hide the size of the Greek debt and allow Greece to enter the euro under the strict Maastricht deficit conditions."

So what do you make of Greece and the financial crisis?  Should it go its own way and deal with its own problems?  Or should the world help it restore stability?

 

Writer: Newsy Staff

Producer: Newsy Staff

Greeks Protest Austerity Plan

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May 5, 2010

Greeks Protest Austerity Plan

(Thumbnail Image: BBC)


"Those quiet, stay at home protests in Greece, they just got a little out of hand here. ... The protesters are protesting social cuts to get the budget in order, cuts like raising the retirement age a little more than a year or two." (CNBC)

Greeks began a two-day protest of the strict austerity measures proposed by the government to pay for the bailout from the IMF and EU. The plan includes higher taxes and public sector wage cuts.

 

A report on the BBC shows how some angry teachers delivered their message.

"A group of teachers invaded the studios of state television and disrupted a discussion program with the education minister. They refused to leave the building until they were allowed to broadcast their message live. They said the government decision to sack 17,000 part-time teachers as part of the austerity measures would lead to education standards being lowered."


A full-blown strike has yet to materialize, and because of that, a Guardian blog says the dramatic descriptions and images from the protests appear to be all hype.

"There is little to indicate a grassroots uprising beyond the occasional truck with loudspeakers telling citizens 'it's time again for revolution' and protesters draping banners over the Acropolis, saying 'peoples of Europe, rise up'. Few in Greece appear to be heeding the advice on the banner."

David Ignatius of The Washington Post says austerity doesn't fit with Greece's image.

"It goes against the free wheeling, boisterous national spirit that makes Greece such a delightful place to visit  and such a nightmare for finance ministers from the more uptight, less spendthrift countries of northern Europe."


An economist talking to Russia Today says the blame lies with the Greek government and with U.S. banks for hiding the debt.

"The Greek governments, and this includes governments going back to 2002, have been aided and abetted by especially Goldman Sachs who designed special derivatives to hide the size of the Greek debt and allow Greece to enter the euro under the strict Maastricht deficit conditions."

So what do you make of Greece and the financial crisis?  Should it go its own way and deal with its own problems?  Or should the world help it restore stability?

 

Writer: Newsy Staff

Producer: Newsy Staff

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