Two women are alive after a very close encounter with a great white shark. They were clearly shaken up by what happened.

"I look over to talk to her and it came completely out of the water and got the bottom of the boat. ... I was flipped over holding onto the bottom of the kayak, and it was petrifying waiting in that water."

Ida Parker and Kristin Orr had taken their kayaks out in Plymouth, Massachusetts. A shark flipped them and had one of the kayaks in its jaws. As the day went on, other stations spoke with them, and you can see the initial shock seem to wear off ...

"It was dark gray, pointy nose, big teeth, big eye. It was right next to me. It was petrifying." 

"Being in the water and thinking: 'Is it under us? Is it around us? Is it going to come back? What if I move? Is someone going to get to me? Is anyone going to come save us?' ... We sat in the water for about 30 minutes. It was the scariest 30 minutes of my life."

The pair waited in the water that long for someone to see them and get rescue help. 

"I saw about four feet of it breach out of the water and latch on to her kayak. ... There's nobody around."

 

"The friends tried to keep each other calm while they waited in the water for help, wondering if the shark would come back."

Experts examined the bite marks and confirmed this was a great white, probably about 14 to 16 feet long. That's the average size of a female great white.

Just last week, a great white was spotted not far from Plymouth, off the coast of Duxbury, Massachusetts. It's unclear if it was the same animal.

Police captured this footage of that shark. As for the attack, Parker and Orr were out around sunset Wednesday and looking to see seals. Sharks are known for eating seals. They say they saw no fins, no warning the shark was there until it flipped them. 

Great White Shark Attacks 2 Off Coast Of Mass.

by Lauren Zima
0
Sources:Google
Transcript
Sep 4, 2014

Great White Shark Attacks 2 Off Coast Of Mass.

(Image source: Getty Images / Dan Kitwood)

BY Lauren Zima

Two women are alive after a very close encounter with a great white shark. They were clearly shaken up by what happened.

"I look over to talk to her and it came completely out of the water and got the bottom of the boat. ... I was flipped over holding onto the bottom of the kayak, and it was petrifying waiting in that water."

Ida Parker and Kristin Orr had taken their kayaks out in Plymouth, Massachusetts. A shark flipped them and had one of the kayaks in its jaws. As the day went on, other stations spoke with them, and you can see the initial shock seem to wear off ...

"It was dark gray, pointy nose, big teeth, big eye. It was right next to me. It was petrifying." 

"Being in the water and thinking: 'Is it under us? Is it around us? Is it going to come back? What if I move? Is someone going to get to me? Is anyone going to come save us?' ... We sat in the water for about 30 minutes. It was the scariest 30 minutes of my life."

The pair waited in the water that long for someone to see them and get rescue help. 

"I saw about four feet of it breach out of the water and latch on to her kayak. ... There's nobody around."

 

"The friends tried to keep each other calm while they waited in the water for help, wondering if the shark would come back."

Experts examined the bite marks and confirmed this was a great white, probably about 14 to 16 feet long. That's the average size of a female great white.

Just last week, a great white was spotted not far from Plymouth, off the coast of Duxbury, Massachusetts. It's unclear if it was the same animal.

Police captured this footage of that shark. As for the attack, Parker and Orr were out around sunset Wednesday and looking to see seals. Sharks are known for eating seals. They say they saw no fins, no warning the shark was there until it flipped them. 

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