(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)


 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

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She calls it a “bridge too far.” Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed the controversial so-called “birther bill.”

“That bill would have required a presidential candidate to provide a birth certificate or a handful of other documents before their names could be placed on a state's ballot.” (VIDEO FROM KFMB)

If candidates couldn’t provide a long form birth certificate -- the bill would have allowed for baptismal or circumcision certificates. 14 other states have introduced similar legislation -- and it’s been rejected in Connecticut, Maine and Montana.

In an interview with Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren - Governor Brewer says the legislation just wasn’t necessary.

GOVERNOR JAN BREWER (R-AZ): “It is something that I felt uncomfortable with and I feel it serves no purpose. ... You know, bottom line is, I just have to call 'em as I see 'em. It doesn't help Arizona. This bill is a distraction.”

Governor Brewer grabbed national headlines last year when she signed a controversial bill giving police wide-ranging authority to detain suspected illegal immigrations. (VIDEO FROM KMSB)

So her rejection of the “birther bill” surprised many political analysts who are calling it a move against her own party.

REPORTER: “She didn’t win a popularity contest today with her own party.” (VIDEO FROM KPNX)

But if it’s a popularity contest with her longstanding critics -- count The Phoenix New Times’ James King among the fans of the veto.

“...big props must go out to Governor Jan Brewer... The bill was Arizona's far-right-wing response to the continuously debunked conspiracy theory that President Barack Obama is not an American citizen … despite it already being a federal requirement to land the job.”

But count Hot Air’s Allahpundit among the confused.

“She just started her new term so electoral politics is immaterial. Is there some core agenda item that she needs Democratic help to pass? Or is she trying to build goodwill with Obama for better cooperation on immigration? Or, just maybe, did she genuinely believe that the bill was stupid and embarrassing to Arizona?”

Supporters of the measure say it had nothing to do with President Obama -- but rather -- the quote
“integrity of the Constitution.”

CNN’s John King isn’t buying that. He asks Orly Taitz -- an outspoken skeptic of President Obama’s citizenship - to explain.

JOHN KING: “Mark me down as skeptical. ... Can you honestly say with a straight face it has nothing to do with President Obama? ... There is a federal constitutional requirement to run for president. Why does any state have to worry about that?”
ORLY TAITZ: “Because the ballots are state ballots. Each state has its own ballots and therefore there has to be a provision in the state ballot whereby, one, running for office, needs to prove he is a natural born citizen...”


If Brewer had signed the legislation - Arizona would have been the first state to pass a “birther bill.” Republican supporters of the legislation in Arizona say they might override the veto -- but it remains unclear whether they have the votes needed to do so.

 

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Transcript by Newsy

Gov. Brewer Surprises, Vetoes 'Birther Bill'

by Christina Hartman
0
Transcript
Apr 19, 2011

Gov. Brewer Surprises, Vetoes 'Birther Bill'

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)


 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

You're watching multisource U.S. news analysis from Newsy

 


She calls it a “bridge too far.” Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed the controversial so-called “birther bill.”

“That bill would have required a presidential candidate to provide a birth certificate or a handful of other documents before their names could be placed on a state's ballot.” (VIDEO FROM KFMB)

If candidates couldn’t provide a long form birth certificate -- the bill would have allowed for baptismal or circumcision certificates. 14 other states have introduced similar legislation -- and it’s been rejected in Connecticut, Maine and Montana.

In an interview with Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren - Governor Brewer says the legislation just wasn’t necessary.

GOVERNOR JAN BREWER (R-AZ): “It is something that I felt uncomfortable with and I feel it serves no purpose. ... You know, bottom line is, I just have to call 'em as I see 'em. It doesn't help Arizona. This bill is a distraction.”

Governor Brewer grabbed national headlines last year when she signed a controversial bill giving police wide-ranging authority to detain suspected illegal immigrations. (VIDEO FROM KMSB)

So her rejection of the “birther bill” surprised many political analysts who are calling it a move against her own party.

REPORTER: “She didn’t win a popularity contest today with her own party.” (VIDEO FROM KPNX)

But if it’s a popularity contest with her longstanding critics -- count The Phoenix New Times’ James King among the fans of the veto.

“...big props must go out to Governor Jan Brewer... The bill was Arizona's far-right-wing response to the continuously debunked conspiracy theory that President Barack Obama is not an American citizen … despite it already being a federal requirement to land the job.”

But count Hot Air’s Allahpundit among the confused.

“She just started her new term so electoral politics is immaterial. Is there some core agenda item that she needs Democratic help to pass? Or is she trying to build goodwill with Obama for better cooperation on immigration? Or, just maybe, did she genuinely believe that the bill was stupid and embarrassing to Arizona?”

Supporters of the measure say it had nothing to do with President Obama -- but rather -- the quote
“integrity of the Constitution.”

CNN’s John King isn’t buying that. He asks Orly Taitz -- an outspoken skeptic of President Obama’s citizenship - to explain.

JOHN KING: “Mark me down as skeptical. ... Can you honestly say with a straight face it has nothing to do with President Obama? ... There is a federal constitutional requirement to run for president. Why does any state have to worry about that?”
ORLY TAITZ: “Because the ballots are state ballots. Each state has its own ballots and therefore there has to be a provision in the state ballot whereby, one, running for office, needs to prove he is a natural born citizen...”


If Brewer had signed the legislation - Arizona would have been the first state to pass a “birther bill.” Republican supporters of the legislation in Arizona say they might override the veto -- but it remains unclear whether they have the votes needed to do so.

 

Follow @Newsy_Videos on Twitter

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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