(Image source: Flickr)

BY MALLORY PERRYMAN

 

You're watching multisource political video news analysis from Newsy.


House Republicans followed-through on a campaign promise to repeal health care- but while the vote prompted a few cheers on the House floor, it seems to have brought on more eye-rolling than confetti-throwing in the media.

CNN explains- that’s because the bill isn’t going anywhere with a Democrat-controlled Senate.

SAMANTHA HAYES: “Republicans acknowledge that an outright repeal is very unlikely.”

So what was the point? A former pollster for President Clinton tells Fox News- it’s clear the public wants Congress to fix the bill, but this didn’t do much of anything.

DOUG SCHOEN (Fmr. pollster to Pres. Clinton): “The American people’s attitude is now ‘Ok, now work with the Democrats to fix the bill’ which is what the president said he is prepared to do. And so things like preexisting conditions and affordability and keeping kids on their parents’ health care toward their 26th birthdays is popular, that’s what the American people want in the way of compromise.”

But The Atlantic points out, the GOP may have simply been listening to the majority. Let’s take a look at the numbers.

When faced with only two options- repeal health care reform, or leave it alone- two major surveys found people do favor repeal. CNN puts it at 50% for repeal and 42% for the status quo.

And a Gallop poll found 46% favor repeal- while 40% say keep it the same.

But when given more choices, the results changed. An expanded ABC/WashingtonPost poll found 45 percent support the law; 19 percent want to repeal some of it; 18 percent want to repeal all of it and 17 percent want to wait and see.


While we’re on numbers -- most agree the Senate’s don’t add up in the GOP’s favor. The Wall Street Journal’s Corey Boles points out Senate Democrats will fight to protect what they view as one of the party’s biggest legislative achievements. But all is not lost. He suggests small compromises are possible.


“One could be an attempt to remove an onerous tax-reporting requirement on small businesses that was included in the health-care law to increase corporate tax collection... Small business owners have complained that the costs of complying with the measure far outweigh any benefits to it.”


So what do those numbers add up to? A Think Progress blogger suggests- they mean Republicans get to tell their base “we tried to repeal Obamacare” without dealing with the repercussions of actually doing it.
 
“The Affordable Care Act has...a fair amount of interest group support…After all, one man’s patient is another man’s customer. But since repeal is just playacting for Fox News watchers, none of these groups are actually going to be pissed at …pro-repeal House members.”

But on the left, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow says the GOP’s decision to repeal instead of replace- only highlights an opportunity for Democrats.
 
RACHEL MADDOW: “But doing so not only forced Democrats to get their act together and name all the parts of that law that are really popular, it also allowed Democrats to point out that every Republican in Washington would like to take those popular things away now.”

Three Democrats joined Republicans in voting to repeal the new health care law. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell promises the Senate will vote on the measure, even though Democrats hold a 53-47 majority in the chamber.

 

Get more multisource political video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Transcript by Newsy

GOP Votes to Repeal 'Obamacare'

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Jan 20, 2011

GOP Votes to Repeal 'Obamacare'

(Image source: Flickr)

BY MALLORY PERRYMAN

 

You're watching multisource political video news analysis from Newsy.


House Republicans followed-through on a campaign promise to repeal health care- but while the vote prompted a few cheers on the House floor, it seems to have brought on more eye-rolling than confetti-throwing in the media.

CNN explains- that’s because the bill isn’t going anywhere with a Democrat-controlled Senate.

SAMANTHA HAYES: “Republicans acknowledge that an outright repeal is very unlikely.”

So what was the point? A former pollster for President Clinton tells Fox News- it’s clear the public wants Congress to fix the bill, but this didn’t do much of anything.

DOUG SCHOEN (Fmr. pollster to Pres. Clinton): “The American people’s attitude is now ‘Ok, now work with the Democrats to fix the bill’ which is what the president said he is prepared to do. And so things like preexisting conditions and affordability and keeping kids on their parents’ health care toward their 26th birthdays is popular, that’s what the American people want in the way of compromise.”

But The Atlantic points out, the GOP may have simply been listening to the majority. Let’s take a look at the numbers.

When faced with only two options- repeal health care reform, or leave it alone- two major surveys found people do favor repeal. CNN puts it at 50% for repeal and 42% for the status quo.

And a Gallop poll found 46% favor repeal- while 40% say keep it the same.

But when given more choices, the results changed. An expanded ABC/WashingtonPost poll found 45 percent support the law; 19 percent want to repeal some of it; 18 percent want to repeal all of it and 17 percent want to wait and see.


While we’re on numbers -- most agree the Senate’s don’t add up in the GOP’s favor. The Wall Street Journal’s Corey Boles points out Senate Democrats will fight to protect what they view as one of the party’s biggest legislative achievements. But all is not lost. He suggests small compromises are possible.


“One could be an attempt to remove an onerous tax-reporting requirement on small businesses that was included in the health-care law to increase corporate tax collection... Small business owners have complained that the costs of complying with the measure far outweigh any benefits to it.”


So what do those numbers add up to? A Think Progress blogger suggests- they mean Republicans get to tell their base “we tried to repeal Obamacare” without dealing with the repercussions of actually doing it.
 
“The Affordable Care Act has...a fair amount of interest group support…After all, one man’s patient is another man’s customer. But since repeal is just playacting for Fox News watchers, none of these groups are actually going to be pissed at …pro-repeal House members.”

But on the left, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow says the GOP’s decision to repeal instead of replace- only highlights an opportunity for Democrats.
 
RACHEL MADDOW: “But doing so not only forced Democrats to get their act together and name all the parts of that law that are really popular, it also allowed Democrats to point out that every Republican in Washington would like to take those popular things away now.”

Three Democrats joined Republicans in voting to repeal the new health care law. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell promises the Senate will vote on the measure, even though Democrats hold a 53-47 majority in the chamber.

 

Get more multisource political video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Transcript by Newsy

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