Google will no longer call apps in its Google Play store "free" if they have in-app purchases.

"Candy Crush," anyone? We'd be lying if we said we hadn't bought a few color bombs and candy hammers. (Via King / "Candy Crush")

The change comes in response to a request by the European Commission.

It asked both Google and Apple not to mislead customers by labeling games "free" if the game offers up in-app purchases. (Via Apple App Store)

But the European Union says Apple has yet to provide a solution. 

Engadget highlighted that fact in its piece, then updated the story to include a statement from Apple. The company argues it's already doing its part in notifying users of in-app purchases.

"Over the last year we made sure any app which enables customers to make in-app purchases is clearly marked. We've also created a Kids Section on the App Store." 

Apple might have made that change because of a lawsuit settled last year. 

The suit alleged it was too easy for kids to make purchases in Apple's app store. (Via Apple Insider

But the EU clearly thinks Apple still has some work to do. The BBC says the Commission even "scolded" the company.

"It singled out Apple for not making a commitment to change. ... The Commission said national authorities had the option to take legal action against companies that were deemed not to be complying with Europe's guidance on free apps."

Google plans to have its changes in effect by September.

Google Won't Call Games With In-App Add-Ons Free, Apple Will

by Christine Slusser
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Transcript
Jul 18, 2014

Google Won't Call Games With In-App Add-Ons Free, Apple Will

(Image source: Getty Images)

BY Christine Slusser

Google will no longer call apps in its Google Play store "free" if they have in-app purchases.

"Candy Crush," anyone? We'd be lying if we said we hadn't bought a few color bombs and candy hammers. (Via King / "Candy Crush")

The change comes in response to a request by the European Commission.

It asked both Google and Apple not to mislead customers by labeling games "free" if the game offers up in-app purchases. (Via Apple App Store)

But the European Union says Apple has yet to provide a solution. 

Engadget highlighted that fact in its piece, then updated the story to include a statement from Apple. The company argues it's already doing its part in notifying users of in-app purchases.

"Over the last year we made sure any app which enables customers to make in-app purchases is clearly marked. We've also created a Kids Section on the App Store." 

Apple might have made that change because of a lawsuit settled last year. 

The suit alleged it was too easy for kids to make purchases in Apple's app store. (Via Apple Insider

But the EU clearly thinks Apple still has some work to do. The BBC says the Commission even "scolded" the company.

"It singled out Apple for not making a commitment to change. ... The Commission said national authorities had the option to take legal action against companies that were deemed not to be complying with Europe's guidance on free apps."

Google plans to have its changes in effect by September.

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