(Image source: Geek.com)


 

BY NATHAN BYRNE


 

In Japan, you can find a vending machine where you can buy just about anything.

 

Machines there are known to dispense everything from an order of fries to a really quick shoeshine. (Via Geobeats)

 

Now, Google Japan is unveiling a vending machine for apps. A writer for Gearburn says you should expect a different delivery method, though. (Via YouTube / Google Play)

 

“The games … don’t roll out of spiral loops, or drop down like cold cans of Cola. No sir, each app is beamed to an Android smartphone over Bluetooth 4.0 or NFC.”

 

According to Engadget’s Mat Smith — you just set your phone in the tray and it starts downloading your app purchase. If you don’t have an Android phone, the machine will let you borrow this Nexus 4 to test-drive free apps.

 

Google is offering a mix of free and paid apps — 18 in all. But besides the novelty of it, what’s the idea?

 

A Geek.com writer thinks: “Google could be using this as a method of testing rapid-fire app gifting. If users had the ability to ‘beam’ purchase codes for apps from one user to another on Google Play, the end result could be very positive.”

 

And TechnoBuffalo points out that while Google hasn’t really flexed its retail muscles in the U.S. —

 

“In Asia … the search giant takes a more aggressive approach, and already boasts a number of Android Nation brick and mortar stores in Indonesia and India.”

 

Google’s app vending machines are set up outside a department store in Tokyo’s Shibuya shopping district.

Google Tries Selling Apps in Vending Machines

by Nathan Byrne
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Transcript
Oct 1, 2013

Google Tries Selling Apps in Vending Machines

(Image source: Geek.com)


 

BY NATHAN BYRNE


 

In Japan, you can find a vending machine where you can buy just about anything.

 

Machines there are known to dispense everything from an order of fries to a really quick shoeshine. (Via Geobeats)

 

Now, Google Japan is unveiling a vending machine for apps. A writer for Gearburn says you should expect a different delivery method, though. (Via YouTube / Google Play)

 

“The games … don’t roll out of spiral loops, or drop down like cold cans of Cola. No sir, each app is beamed to an Android smartphone over Bluetooth 4.0 or NFC.”

 

According to Engadget’s Mat Smith — you just set your phone in the tray and it starts downloading your app purchase. If you don’t have an Android phone, the machine will let you borrow this Nexus 4 to test-drive free apps.

 

Google is offering a mix of free and paid apps — 18 in all. But besides the novelty of it, what’s the idea?

 

A Geek.com writer thinks: “Google could be using this as a method of testing rapid-fire app gifting. If users had the ability to ‘beam’ purchase codes for apps from one user to another on Google Play, the end result could be very positive.”

 

And TechnoBuffalo points out that while Google hasn’t really flexed its retail muscles in the U.S. —

 

“In Asia … the search giant takes a more aggressive approach, and already boasts a number of Android Nation brick and mortar stores in Indonesia and India.”

 

Google’s app vending machines are set up outside a department store in Tokyo’s Shibuya shopping district.

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