(Image Source: TG Daily)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Small business owners looking to take advantage of Google Apps will need their checkbooks to sign up for the previously free service. According to an announcement on Google’s blog...

Small and large companies alike will only have the option to sign up for Google’s premium version of Google Apps for Businesses. This will include 24/7 phone support for any issue, a 25GB inbox, and a 99.9 percent uptime guarantee with no scheduled downtime. Pricing will remain $50 per user, per year.

Google used to offer the service for free for businesses with fewer than 200 employees. But the company has changed this a number of times, most recently limiting the number of free users to 10 early last year. And a blogger for The Next Web explains the latest announcement isn’t much of a surprise.

“The move to end free usage makes a lot of sense, and has been much expected, given the investment Google has made in its consumer-targeted cloud offerings, which includes the creation of Dropbox rival Google Drive. The company is also likely to make big changes to Gmail after it hired the team behind much-lauded iOS and Mac mail client Sparrow in August.”

The Wall Street Journal says more than 5 million businesses use Google Apps, but most use the free version. 40 million users worldwide are said to use both the free and paid version of the service. But a writer for The Verge says Google’s change could mean a loss in business.

In the past, small businesses have taken advantage of Google’s low-cost benefits. The new change is said to encourage the competition between Google and Microsoft. Office apps from Microsoft cost $72 per user, per year. But the writer says small businesses might look elsewhere for these services to avoid charges on new accounts.

“Google's announcement has just made it easier for other services to capture the small business market with low-cost services, so expect 2013 to be a big cloud battle amongst the big and small players.”

According to The Wall Street Journal, the change represents Google’s renewed interest in serving small businesses. But Google has recently made several moves away from free services.

“Last year, Google began charging businesses such as mobile app makers that access Google Maps more than 25,000 times per day. This year, Google began charging retailers seeking to be included in its Google Shopping service.”

Google says the change will not affect existing customers.

 

Google to Charge Small Businesses for Google Apps

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Dec 7, 2012

Google to Charge Small Businesses for Google Apps

 

(Image Source: TG Daily)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Small business owners looking to take advantage of Google Apps will need their checkbooks to sign up for the previously free service. According to an announcement on Google’s blog...

Small and large companies alike will only have the option to sign up for Google’s premium version of Google Apps for Businesses. This will include 24/7 phone support for any issue, a 25GB inbox, and a 99.9 percent uptime guarantee with no scheduled downtime. Pricing will remain $50 per user, per year.

Google used to offer the service for free for businesses with fewer than 200 employees. But the company has changed this a number of times, most recently limiting the number of free users to 10 early last year. And a blogger for The Next Web explains the latest announcement isn’t much of a surprise.

“The move to end free usage makes a lot of sense, and has been much expected, given the investment Google has made in its consumer-targeted cloud offerings, which includes the creation of Dropbox rival Google Drive. The company is also likely to make big changes to Gmail after it hired the team behind much-lauded iOS and Mac mail client Sparrow in August.”

The Wall Street Journal says more than 5 million businesses use Google Apps, but most use the free version. 40 million users worldwide are said to use both the free and paid version of the service. But a writer for The Verge says Google’s change could mean a loss in business.

In the past, small businesses have taken advantage of Google’s low-cost benefits. The new change is said to encourage the competition between Google and Microsoft. Office apps from Microsoft cost $72 per user, per year. But the writer says small businesses might look elsewhere for these services to avoid charges on new accounts.

“Google's announcement has just made it easier for other services to capture the small business market with low-cost services, so expect 2013 to be a big cloud battle amongst the big and small players.”

According to The Wall Street Journal, the change represents Google’s renewed interest in serving small businesses. But Google has recently made several moves away from free services.

“Last year, Google began charging businesses such as mobile app makers that access Google Maps more than 25,000 times per day. This year, Google began charging retailers seeking to be included in its Google Shopping service.”

Google says the change will not affect existing customers.

 

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3