(Image source: RT)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE


Google’s Eric Schmidt and former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson are headed home after their much-scrutinized trip to North Korea. Their goal — they said — to explain North Korea is doomed if the country doesn’t embrace the web. But many are questioning the delegation’s purpose for the visit.

CNN Money reports Richardson described the trip as a “private humanitarian mission.” The delegation wasn’t advocating just for internet usage, but asking the country to stop its missile launches and nuclear tests. And also, negotiate the release of American Kenneth Bae, who is currently detained in North Korea.

The Guardian says one could speculate the group was even there because North Korea’s new leader Kim Jong Un has expressed interest in using science and technology to build the economy. Nonetheless, The Guardian says it’s definitely “one strange photo-op.”

“Whatever the cause and effect of Schmidt's visit, there's an ineffable strangeness to photos of the Google chairman watching a rigged demonstration of the freedom to use Google – a strangeness that only a state that is a terminal prisoner to its own insularity could devise.”

But SlashGear reports the U.S. State Department was less than thrilled about the trip, especially with North Korea’s recent rocket launches-- which is a source of increasing tension between the two countries. A spokeswoman for the state department said...

“Frankly, we don’t think the timing of this is particularly helpful, but they are private citizens and they are making their own decisions. They are not carrying any messages from us.”

A writer for The New York Times says most North Koreans don’t have access to Google, the Internet or even a computer. While the country technically has Internet available, not many get to use it.

“ … and if they do, their surfing is strictly monitored. Experts say fewer than a thousand people have such access, most of them software developers, government officials and well-connected party loyalists.”

In the face of that, Google’s Schmidt continues to promote a free and open internet.

“Once the Internet starts, citizens in a country can certainly build on top of it. But the government has to do something. They have to make it possible for people to use the internet, which the government has not yet done.”

(SOC)

 

 

Google's Eric Schmidt and North Korea: Takeaways

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Jan 10, 2013

Google's Eric Schmidt and North Korea: Takeaways

 

(Image source: RT)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE


Google’s Eric Schmidt and former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson are headed home after their much-scrutinized trip to North Korea. Their goal — they said — to explain North Korea is doomed if the country doesn’t embrace the web. But many are questioning the delegation’s purpose for the visit.

CNN Money reports Richardson described the trip as a “private humanitarian mission.” The delegation wasn’t advocating just for internet usage, but asking the country to stop its missile launches and nuclear tests. And also, negotiate the release of American Kenneth Bae, who is currently detained in North Korea.

The Guardian says one could speculate the group was even there because North Korea’s new leader Kim Jong Un has expressed interest in using science and technology to build the economy. Nonetheless, The Guardian says it’s definitely “one strange photo-op.”

“Whatever the cause and effect of Schmidt's visit, there's an ineffable strangeness to photos of the Google chairman watching a rigged demonstration of the freedom to use Google – a strangeness that only a state that is a terminal prisoner to its own insularity could devise.”

But SlashGear reports the U.S. State Department was less than thrilled about the trip, especially with North Korea’s recent rocket launches-- which is a source of increasing tension between the two countries. A spokeswoman for the state department said...

“Frankly, we don’t think the timing of this is particularly helpful, but they are private citizens and they are making their own decisions. They are not carrying any messages from us.”

A writer for The New York Times says most North Koreans don’t have access to Google, the Internet or even a computer. While the country technically has Internet available, not many get to use it.

“ … and if they do, their surfing is strictly monitored. Experts say fewer than a thousand people have such access, most of them software developers, government officials and well-connected party loyalists.”

In the face of that, Google’s Schmidt continues to promote a free and open internet.

“Once the Internet starts, citizens in a country can certainly build on top of it. But the government has to do something. They have to make it possible for people to use the internet, which the government has not yet done.”

(SOC)

 

 

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