(Image source: PC World)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

 

In the last year, numerous problems surrounding the safety of passwords were constantly highlighted in the media.

 

When Wired’s Mat Honan was hacked—he wanted to see just how easy it was and found a site that could give him any information you’ve ever typed into a computer—and all for just $4.

 

Also, it wasn’t very helpful when security consultant Mark Burnett released a list of the 10,000 most common passwords.

 

And most recently, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found when a user aims for a long and complicated password filled with numbers and uppercase letters, picking that cyberlock ultimately becomes easier.

 

But Google might have come up with a way to keep your password safer: simply take it with you.

 

Google’s latest pilot program works to get your passwords OFF of your computer and into your hand with USB cards called Yubikeys.

 

It’s basically the same concept as coming home and unlocking your front door to get in. You plug the Yubikey into the computer preset with your password and, voila, you’re logged into your Google account.

 

Right now, Google account users can rely on the site’s two-step verification system for extra security. This notifies you via your phone when your account is accessed from an unfamiliar device.

Google claims with the Yubikey, password protection can be easier without all the back and forth between devices. But it’s important to point out that this isn’t without challenges.

 

A blogger for PC World explains, There’d have to be a backup sign-in method—one that’s more secure than just a password—in case the device becomes lost or damaged …  Also, not everyone will want to wear a ring or carry their phones around all the time just to use their computers.”

 

And then there’s always the case that not every device has a USB port, also—this system only applies to Google so other web developers will have to jump on the Yubikey wagon. PC Mag explains another option Google is looking at.

 

“...a smartphone that could authorize a new PC with one tap. Ultimately, these devices could mean the end of passwords you'd have to remember.”

 

Google will release its plans and research in the IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine later this month. Until then—keep the hackers close and your passwords even closer.

Google Reveals New Plan For Password Protection

by Logan Tittle
0
Transcript
Jan 19, 2013

Google Reveals New Plan For Password Protection

 

(Image source: PC World)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

 

In the last year, numerous problems surrounding the safety of passwords were constantly highlighted in the media.

 

When Wired’s Mat Honan was hacked—he wanted to see just how easy it was and found a site that could give him any information you’ve ever typed into a computer—and all for just $4.

 

Also, it wasn’t very helpful when security consultant Mark Burnett released a list of the 10,000 most common passwords.

 

And most recently, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found when a user aims for a long and complicated password filled with numbers and uppercase letters, picking that cyberlock ultimately becomes easier.

 

But Google might have come up with a way to keep your password safer: simply take it with you.

 

Google’s latest pilot program works to get your passwords OFF of your computer and into your hand with USB cards called Yubikeys.

 

It’s basically the same concept as coming home and unlocking your front door to get in. You plug the Yubikey into the computer preset with your password and, voila, you’re logged into your Google account.

 

Right now, Google account users can rely on the site’s two-step verification system for extra security. This notifies you via your phone when your account is accessed from an unfamiliar device.

Google claims with the Yubikey, password protection can be easier without all the back and forth between devices. But it’s important to point out that this isn’t without challenges.

 

A blogger for PC World explains, There’d have to be a backup sign-in method—one that’s more secure than just a password—in case the device becomes lost or damaged …  Also, not everyone will want to wear a ring or carry their phones around all the time just to use their computers.”

 

And then there’s always the case that not every device has a USB port, also—this system only applies to Google so other web developers will have to jump on the Yubikey wagon. PC Mag explains another option Google is looking at.

 

“...a smartphone that could authorize a new PC with one tap. Ultimately, these devices could mean the end of passwords you'd have to remember.”

 

Google will release its plans and research in the IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine later this month. Until then—keep the hackers close and your passwords even closer.

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