(Image source: TechCrunch)


BY KERRY LEARY

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

Ever wanted to see the Dead Sea Scrolls without the travel expense? Well, you’re in luck. Thousands of Dead Sea Scroll fragments went online Tuesday thanks to a website launched by Google and the Israel Antiquities Authority.

The website offers high-resolution images of the famous scrolls written 2,000 years ago. The two teamed up to make the famed manuscripts available to scholars and history fanatics.

The scrolls were first discovered on the Dead Sea shore in the 1940s.

These documents were hidden in the cave on the eve of the destruction of the city of Jerusalem by the Romans.”

TechCrunch puts the historical significance of these scrolls into perspective, noting:

“ [the scrolls include] the earliest known copies of the Book of Deuteronomy, which includes the Ten Commandments; part of Chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis, and hundreds more 2,000-year old texts focused on the life and teachings of Jesus.”

Each of the images is complete with information about where the script was found, the language it’s written in, and the paper type. The Times of Israel says a team at Tel Aviv University is …

“… using the new images to try to piece together fragments into larger sections which might yield new information about the content of some of the scrolls. For scholars, the fragments are ‘the ultimate puzzle’ …  Google is involved in the project as part of a broader effort to preserve world cultural heritage online.”

On the new website, users are able to search for phrases in Hebrew or English, sort fragment according to where each was found and even view where each scroll was found on Google Maps.

Google Puts Dead Sea Scrolls Online

by
0
Transcript
Dec 18, 2012

Google Puts Dead Sea Scrolls Online

(Image source: TechCrunch)


BY KERRY LEARY

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

Ever wanted to see the Dead Sea Scrolls without the travel expense? Well, you’re in luck. Thousands of Dead Sea Scroll fragments went online Tuesday thanks to a website launched by Google and the Israel Antiquities Authority.

The website offers high-resolution images of the famous scrolls written 2,000 years ago. The two teamed up to make the famed manuscripts available to scholars and history fanatics.

The scrolls were first discovered on the Dead Sea shore in the 1940s.

These documents were hidden in the cave on the eve of the destruction of the city of Jerusalem by the Romans.”

TechCrunch puts the historical significance of these scrolls into perspective, noting:

“ [the scrolls include] the earliest known copies of the Book of Deuteronomy, which includes the Ten Commandments; part of Chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis, and hundreds more 2,000-year old texts focused on the life and teachings of Jesus.”

Each of the images is complete with information about where the script was found, the language it’s written in, and the paper type. The Times of Israel says a team at Tel Aviv University is …

“… using the new images to try to piece together fragments into larger sections which might yield new information about the content of some of the scrolls. For scholars, the fragments are ‘the ultimate puzzle’ …  Google is involved in the project as part of a broader effort to preserve world cultural heritage online.”

On the new website, users are able to search for phrases in Hebrew or English, sort fragment according to where each was found and even view where each scroll was found on Google Maps.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www2