(Image source: CNET)


 

BY EVAN THOMAS


 

Google is boosting its data encryption amid the ongoing revelations of NSA data collection.

 

Though Google’s efforts began in 2012, The Washington Post reports the company fast-tracked the initiative in June of this year as reports of broad NSA surveillance — and suggestions of complicity from web companies — began circulating.

 

Google plans to secure the data handled by its datacenters using “end-to-end” encryption, which means it will be scrambled while it’s sitting in storage on a server and also while it’s sent between locations on Google’s network.

 

But Google’s goal isn’t to create an unbreakable code. PCMag explains it’s meant to increase the time and energy required from the NSA to access information. “This, in effect, both slows them down and forces them to reprioritize limited resources toward specific users they're interested in finding more information about.”


Which means fewer resources available for less-discriminate dragnet operations that vacuum up mass volumes of data. CNET likens it to locking your front door overnight.

“It won’t stop an aggressive thief from breaking in, but it will deter many and make it harder for all but the best thieves.”

 

Google is staying quiet on what specific encryption schemes it intends to use, the costs of the project and the number of datacenters it will impact.


And despite these efforts, Google will still be obligated to comply with legal governmental requests for information under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. (Via Softpedia)

 

While Google can’t stop these requests, it does want to be able to tell its users when and how often they happen. Google and Microsoft are teaming up to sue the government for the right to disclose info on received FISA requests. (Via ZDNet)

 

The first round of motions in the case are due Monday, September 9.

Google Making Things More Difficult for NSA

by Logan Tittle
0
Transcript
Sep 8, 2013

Google Making Things More Difficult for NSA

(Image source: CNET)


 

BY EVAN THOMAS


 

Google is boosting its data encryption amid the ongoing revelations of NSA data collection.

 

Though Google’s efforts began in 2012, The Washington Post reports the company fast-tracked the initiative in June of this year as reports of broad NSA surveillance — and suggestions of complicity from web companies — began circulating.

 

Google plans to secure the data handled by its datacenters using “end-to-end” encryption, which means it will be scrambled while it’s sitting in storage on a server and also while it’s sent between locations on Google’s network.

 

But Google’s goal isn’t to create an unbreakable code. PCMag explains it’s meant to increase the time and energy required from the NSA to access information. “This, in effect, both slows them down and forces them to reprioritize limited resources toward specific users they're interested in finding more information about.”


Which means fewer resources available for less-discriminate dragnet operations that vacuum up mass volumes of data. CNET likens it to locking your front door overnight.

“It won’t stop an aggressive thief from breaking in, but it will deter many and make it harder for all but the best thieves.”

 

Google is staying quiet on what specific encryption schemes it intends to use, the costs of the project and the number of datacenters it will impact.


And despite these efforts, Google will still be obligated to comply with legal governmental requests for information under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. (Via Softpedia)

 

While Google can’t stop these requests, it does want to be able to tell its users when and how often they happen. Google and Microsoft are teaming up to sue the government for the right to disclose info on received FISA requests. (Via ZDNet)

 

The first round of motions in the case are due Monday, September 9.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3