(Image Source: Digital Trends)

 

BY ADNAN S. KHAN

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Go Daddy -- a name usually associated with cheesy commercials and curvaceous women, and not congressional battles.
 

But when the web-domain registrar decided to support the Stop Online Piracy Act -- or SOPA --  it needed more than parade of bodacious babes to distract angry customers.
 

Mass boycotts ran amok, threats from Anonymous piled on and customers began threatening to pull their domains from the service. Ben Huh, CEO of Cheezburger, a company which runs a host of humor web sites, threaten to move over a thousand domains from Go Daddy.

And when Reddit and Wikipedia started making similar threats, Go Daddy finally caved late Friday. TIME has the company’s statement.
 

“Fighting online piracy is of the utmost importance, which is why Go Daddy has been working to help craft revisions to this legislation–but we can clearly do better … Go Daddy is rooted in the idea of First Amendment Rights and believes 100 percent that the Internet is a key engine for our new economy.”
 

A writer for Inquisitr questions why Go Daddy supported SOPA in the first place.
 

“The fact that GoDaddy -- a company whose bread and butter is largely dependent on the free and open web -- supported the internet killing legislation was kind of surprising in some ways … but not so much in others (the company has shown a relatively large disregard to customer sentiment in the past…)”
 

So is this a win for the SOPA opponents? ComputerWorld says -- not really.
 

“SOPA still has strong support in Congress and among companies in several U.S. industries. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, one of the driving forces behind the bill, has said that more than 400 organizations have voiced support.”

Even so, it hasn’t stopped the denizens of the web from celebrating. Gizmodo writes…
 

“If a sleazeball company like Go Daddy can ditch SOPA because of pressure from the Internet, you bet other companies currently supporting SOPA will cave too. Let yourself be heard and let’s freaking kill this bill.”
 

On the other hand--Bloomberg is taking a more ‘wait and see’ approach, considering that Congress is no longer in session.

Male Anchor: “It’s been a tempest in our teapot for a while here. I expect to hear about this more going forward. Cuz it is really a … you the two worlds of Bloomberg are colliding, right? It’s the copyright holders and big media companies the Comcast and the Time Warners fighting against the Googles… the Twitters… and the Facebooks… and those other companies that we cover so much.”
Female Anchor: “It will be really interesting to see what happens when congress comes back in session in January.”

GoDaddy Pulls Support from SOPA

by Adnan Khan
0
Transcript
Dec 26, 2011

GoDaddy Pulls Support from SOPA

(Image Source: Digital Trends)

 

BY ADNAN S. KHAN

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Go Daddy -- a name usually associated with cheesy commercials and curvaceous women, and not congressional battles.
 

But when the web-domain registrar decided to support the Stop Online Piracy Act -- or SOPA --  it needed more than parade of bodacious babes to distract angry customers.
 

Mass boycotts ran amok, threats from Anonymous piled on and customers began threatening to pull their domains from the service. Ben Huh, CEO of Cheezburger, a company which runs a host of humor web sites, threaten to move over a thousand domains from Go Daddy.

And when Reddit and Wikipedia started making similar threats, Go Daddy finally caved late Friday. TIME has the company’s statement.
 

“Fighting online piracy is of the utmost importance, which is why Go Daddy has been working to help craft revisions to this legislation–but we can clearly do better … Go Daddy is rooted in the idea of First Amendment Rights and believes 100 percent that the Internet is a key engine for our new economy.”
 

A writer for Inquisitr questions why Go Daddy supported SOPA in the first place.
 

“The fact that GoDaddy -- a company whose bread and butter is largely dependent on the free and open web -- supported the internet killing legislation was kind of surprising in some ways … but not so much in others (the company has shown a relatively large disregard to customer sentiment in the past…)”
 

So is this a win for the SOPA opponents? ComputerWorld says -- not really.
 

“SOPA still has strong support in Congress and among companies in several U.S. industries. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, one of the driving forces behind the bill, has said that more than 400 organizations have voiced support.”

Even so, it hasn’t stopped the denizens of the web from celebrating. Gizmodo writes…
 

“If a sleazeball company like Go Daddy can ditch SOPA because of pressure from the Internet, you bet other companies currently supporting SOPA will cave too. Let yourself be heard and let’s freaking kill this bill.”
 

On the other hand--Bloomberg is taking a more ‘wait and see’ approach, considering that Congress is no longer in session.

Male Anchor: “It’s been a tempest in our teapot for a while here. I expect to hear about this more going forward. Cuz it is really a … you the two worlds of Bloomberg are colliding, right? It’s the copyright holders and big media companies the Comcast and the Time Warners fighting against the Googles… the Twitters… and the Facebooks… and those other companies that we cover so much.”
Female Anchor: “It will be really interesting to see what happens when congress comes back in session in January.”

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