(Image source: WSB-TV)

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR MIKAH SARGENT 

A Georgia mom is outraged at police for notifying her of her son’s death in a Facebook post.
Anna Lamb-Creasey began searching for her son Rickie Lamb when he went missing on January 25th.  She made the usual calls -- to hospitals and jails. Little did she know -- police had tried to notify Anna that Rickie was dead -- on Facebook.    Atlanta’s WSB-TV has more on the strange posting from a Misty Hancock.

“Anna Lamb didn’t know who Misty Hancock was... nor why she was sending her messages to contact Clayton County police.  They paid it no mind because of the strange name, and because of the profile picture of rapper TI.”

Anna thought the posting was a fake.   But it turns out -- the posting was from an actual police officer.
Social News Daily notes...


“Facebook notifications of death tend to happen among kin and friends, and the battle over whether Facebook is an appropriate means of official communication (such as serving a summons or attempting to collect on a debt) has been a constant matter of dispute...”

Using Facebook for such a notification is one sticking point. The other Facebook snafu?  The posting was tucked away in a box -- most people never use -- marked “other.”    Still, Daily Dot finds it hard to place blame on police -- at least in part....

“When you send a message to someone you don't know on Facebook, it gets sequestered to the hidden ‘Other’ folder, which only appears as a grayed-out tab on the site's main messages tab. The police, like so many other Facebook users, probably have no idea this happens.”

But the Huffington Post notes... increasingly, police are turning to Facebook when other means of contact fail.  It cites two such cases.

The Clayton County police chief has apologized to the family, and the department is reviewing the case.  WSB-TV reports, Rickie Lamb was killed while crossing a busy intersection on January 24th, but because he had no form of current ID, police didn’t know how to contact next of kin.
 

Georgia Police Use Facebook to Notify Mom of Son's Death

by Jim Flink
0
Transcript
Feb 20, 2013

Georgia Police Use Facebook to Notify Mom of Son's Death

(Image source: WSB-TV)

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR MIKAH SARGENT 

A Georgia mom is outraged at police for notifying her of her son’s death in a Facebook post.
Anna Lamb-Creasey began searching for her son Rickie Lamb when he went missing on January 25th.  She made the usual calls -- to hospitals and jails. Little did she know -- police had tried to notify Anna that Rickie was dead -- on Facebook.    Atlanta’s WSB-TV has more on the strange posting from a Misty Hancock.

“Anna Lamb didn’t know who Misty Hancock was... nor why she was sending her messages to contact Clayton County police.  They paid it no mind because of the strange name, and because of the profile picture of rapper TI.”

Anna thought the posting was a fake.   But it turns out -- the posting was from an actual police officer.
Social News Daily notes...


“Facebook notifications of death tend to happen among kin and friends, and the battle over whether Facebook is an appropriate means of official communication (such as serving a summons or attempting to collect on a debt) has been a constant matter of dispute...”

Using Facebook for such a notification is one sticking point. The other Facebook snafu?  The posting was tucked away in a box -- most people never use -- marked “other.”    Still, Daily Dot finds it hard to place blame on police -- at least in part....

“When you send a message to someone you don't know on Facebook, it gets sequestered to the hidden ‘Other’ folder, which only appears as a grayed-out tab on the site's main messages tab. The police, like so many other Facebook users, probably have no idea this happens.”

But the Huffington Post notes... increasingly, police are turning to Facebook when other means of contact fail.  It cites two such cases.

The Clayton County police chief has apologized to the family, and the department is reviewing the case.  WSB-TV reports, Rickie Lamb was killed while crossing a busy intersection on January 24th, but because he had no form of current ID, police didn’t know how to contact next of kin.
 

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