(Image source: Flickr / Bart Everson)


 

BY NATHAN BYRNE


 

 

Should marijuana be legal? Now, more people seem to think yes than ever before.

 

 

58 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legalized, according to Gallup’s latest poll. (Via Flickr / David Shankbone)

 

 

How’d we get here? The Gallup poll has been asking Americans about the legalization of marijuana since 1969.

 

 

The time of Woodstock. The time when only 12 percent of those polled favored legalization. Support doubled in the 1970s to as high as 28 percent. (Via Warner Bros. / “Woodstock”)

 

 

It stayed pretty flat in the ‘80s and ‘90s, and finally hit 50 percent in 2011.

 

 

The Huffington Post notes: “Much of the new support for legalization comes among independent voters … [and] Majorities of all age groups up to age 64 also support legalization, including two-thirds of those from 18 to 29.”

 

 

A couple of factors might’ve pushed pro-legalization opinions to the current number. Earlier this year, another Gallup poll showed 38 percent of Americans admitted to trying marijuana. And, both Colorado and Washington legalized the drug in the past year.

 

 

The Washington Post reports the issue is likely to show up on ballots between now and 2014 — in at least seven other states — including Maine.

 

 

“In two weeks, the state’s capital will decide whether to legalize possession for adults 21 and over.” (Via MSNBC)

 

 

On the national level, Politico says: “The issue is largely split along party lines; 65 percent of Democrats voicing support for legalizing marijuana while only 35 percent of Republicans back such efforts.”

 

 

So, just how popular is marijuana, really? A writer for Business Insider decided to go through Gallup’s other 2013 polls, saying, “these days, it's hard to find much of anything that 58 percent of Americans like.”

 

 

The result? Americans only showed more unity on two other issues: 83 percent favored background checks on gun buyers and 64 percent supported making same-sex relations legal.

Gallup Shows Highest-Ever Support for Weed Legalization

by Nathan Byrne
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Transcript
Oct 22, 2013

Gallup Shows Highest-Ever Support for Weed Legalization

(Image source: Flickr / Bart Everson)


 

BY NATHAN BYRNE


 

 

Should marijuana be legal? Now, more people seem to think yes than ever before.

 

 

58 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legalized, according to Gallup’s latest poll. (Via Flickr / David Shankbone)

 

 

How’d we get here? The Gallup poll has been asking Americans about the legalization of marijuana since 1969.

 

 

The time of Woodstock. The time when only 12 percent of those polled favored legalization. Support doubled in the 1970s to as high as 28 percent. (Via Warner Bros. / “Woodstock”)

 

 

It stayed pretty flat in the ‘80s and ‘90s, and finally hit 50 percent in 2011.

 

 

The Huffington Post notes: “Much of the new support for legalization comes among independent voters … [and] Majorities of all age groups up to age 64 also support legalization, including two-thirds of those from 18 to 29.”

 

 

A couple of factors might’ve pushed pro-legalization opinions to the current number. Earlier this year, another Gallup poll showed 38 percent of Americans admitted to trying marijuana. And, both Colorado and Washington legalized the drug in the past year.

 

 

The Washington Post reports the issue is likely to show up on ballots between now and 2014 — in at least seven other states — including Maine.

 

 

“In two weeks, the state’s capital will decide whether to legalize possession for adults 21 and over.” (Via MSNBC)

 

 

On the national level, Politico says: “The issue is largely split along party lines; 65 percent of Democrats voicing support for legalizing marijuana while only 35 percent of Republicans back such efforts.”

 

 

So, just how popular is marijuana, really? A writer for Business Insider decided to go through Gallup’s other 2013 polls, saying, “these days, it's hard to find much of anything that 58 percent of Americans like.”

 

 

The result? Americans only showed more unity on two other issues: 83 percent favored background checks on gun buyers and 64 percent supported making same-sex relations legal.

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