(Image source: Tree Hugger)
 

BY LIAM KEEGAN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


A former BP engineer is the first to be criminally charged in connection with a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. But as Fox News reports — the engineer isn’t charged with causing the spill but rather — trying to cover it up.

“A man by the name of Kurt Mix is charged with deleting more than 200 text messages after learning his electronic files were to be collected just months after the spill.”

The Wall Street Journal says the Texas engineer, who faces two counts of obstruction of justice, sent sensitive information by text to his co-worker. Some of those texts contained information that conflicted with BP’s public statements about the size of the spill.

“A message from the first day of the efforts said, ‘Too much flowrate—over 15,000,’ indicating the flow from the well was three times higher than the company had said was the official rate of flow.”

Mix’s text messages also revealed the name of BP’s recovery attempt - Operation Top Kill.

“In [the text messages], Mix admits that a maneuver called Top Kill, in which BP injected heavy fluids into the well to try to stop the flow of oil, was failing.”

Of course — Mix isn’t in trouble for sending the texts. He’s in trouble for erasing them. According to the Washington Post, Mix could face a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000 - if convicted on the obstruction charges. Bloomberg BusinessWeek has an FBI agent’s statement in the case.

“Mix deleted numerous electronic records relating to the Deepwater Horizon disaster response, including records concerning the amount of oil potentially flowing from the well, after being repeatedly informed of his obligation to maintain such records...”

A former environmental crimes chief at the Justice Department tells the New York Times, these new charges still don’t hold anyone accountable for causing the 2010 disaster.

“It is no surprise that the Justice Department would bring obstruction of justice charges if they believe that BP officials attempted to hide information about the size of the spill. But today’s charges leave unanswered the larger question of whether any of the companies involved and any individuals will be criminally charged with causing the worst accidental oil spill in history.”

Former BP Engineer Charged in Gulf Oil Spill Disaster

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Apr 24, 2012

Former BP Engineer Charged in Gulf Oil Spill Disaster

(Image source: Tree Hugger)
 

BY LIAM KEEGAN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


A former BP engineer is the first to be criminally charged in connection with a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. But as Fox News reports — the engineer isn’t charged with causing the spill but rather — trying to cover it up.

“A man by the name of Kurt Mix is charged with deleting more than 200 text messages after learning his electronic files were to be collected just months after the spill.”

The Wall Street Journal says the Texas engineer, who faces two counts of obstruction of justice, sent sensitive information by text to his co-worker. Some of those texts contained information that conflicted with BP’s public statements about the size of the spill.

“A message from the first day of the efforts said, ‘Too much flowrate—over 15,000,’ indicating the flow from the well was three times higher than the company had said was the official rate of flow.”

Mix’s text messages also revealed the name of BP’s recovery attempt - Operation Top Kill.

“In [the text messages], Mix admits that a maneuver called Top Kill, in which BP injected heavy fluids into the well to try to stop the flow of oil, was failing.”

Of course — Mix isn’t in trouble for sending the texts. He’s in trouble for erasing them. According to the Washington Post, Mix could face a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000 - if convicted on the obstruction charges. Bloomberg BusinessWeek has an FBI agent’s statement in the case.

“Mix deleted numerous electronic records relating to the Deepwater Horizon disaster response, including records concerning the amount of oil potentially flowing from the well, after being repeatedly informed of his obligation to maintain such records...”

A former environmental crimes chief at the Justice Department tells the New York Times, these new charges still don’t hold anyone accountable for causing the 2010 disaster.

“It is no surprise that the Justice Department would bring obstruction of justice charges if they believe that BP officials attempted to hide information about the size of the spill. But today’s charges leave unanswered the larger question of whether any of the companies involved and any individuals will be criminally charged with causing the worst accidental oil spill in history.”

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