(Image Source: The New York Times)

 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

with contributions from Harumendhah Helmy

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

With its 29 electoral college votes, Florida was thought to play a big role in the winner’s total. But two days after the election’s results, we STILL don’t know which candidate the Sunshine State picked.


“The state is the only one not to declare a winner. Poll workers are sorting through ballots after a surge of absentee votes. (FLASH) Officials blame the delays on a ballot cluttered with referendums.”
 

Not that Florida’s actual tally matters for the result — President Obama far surpassed the 270 electoral votes he needed to win.

OBAMA: “We have fought our way back and we know in our hearts that for the United States of America, the best is yet to come.”

As of Thursday afternoon, Florida was leaning Obama, but by a small margin. (From: The Huffington Post)
 

In the days leading up to the election, polls show Romney’s chances in the state looked promising. (From: Real Clear Politics)
 

But by Thursday after the election, Romney’s campaign has officially conceded Florida. In a statement to the Miami Herald, a Romney advisor said the campaign thought the state was winnable:
 

“We thought ... we had done what we needed to win. Obviously, we didn’t, and for that I and every other operative in Florida has a sick feeling that we left something on the table.”
 

According to CNN, election officials in Florida worked overnight to count ballots, and Miami-Dade County plans to start counting the almost 3,000 provisional ballots Thursday afternoon.

“Provisional ballots, they're going to be done tomorrow. There's still three other counties that are still counting the absentee and provisional votes.”
 

While votes are still being counted, Romney is unlikely to catch up because there aren’t enough votes in Republican areas to make up the difference.

MIami-Dade’s election supervisor told CNN she’s “embarrassed” at the situation there. She blames high turnout and unusually long ballots in part for the slow process.

 

Florida Still Hasn't Called Election Winner; Romney Concedes

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Nov 8, 2012

Florida Still Hasn't Called Election Winner; Romney Concedes

(Image Source: The New York Times)

 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

with contributions from Harumendhah Helmy

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

With its 29 electoral college votes, Florida was thought to play a big role in the winner’s total. But two days after the election’s results, we STILL don’t know which candidate the Sunshine State picked.


“The state is the only one not to declare a winner. Poll workers are sorting through ballots after a surge of absentee votes. (FLASH) Officials blame the delays on a ballot cluttered with referendums.”
 

Not that Florida’s actual tally matters for the result — President Obama far surpassed the 270 electoral votes he needed to win.

OBAMA: “We have fought our way back and we know in our hearts that for the United States of America, the best is yet to come.”

As of Thursday afternoon, Florida was leaning Obama, but by a small margin. (From: The Huffington Post)
 

In the days leading up to the election, polls show Romney’s chances in the state looked promising. (From: Real Clear Politics)
 

But by Thursday after the election, Romney’s campaign has officially conceded Florida. In a statement to the Miami Herald, a Romney advisor said the campaign thought the state was winnable:
 

“We thought ... we had done what we needed to win. Obviously, we didn’t, and for that I and every other operative in Florida has a sick feeling that we left something on the table.”
 

According to CNN, election officials in Florida worked overnight to count ballots, and Miami-Dade County plans to start counting the almost 3,000 provisional ballots Thursday afternoon.

“Provisional ballots, they're going to be done tomorrow. There's still three other counties that are still counting the absentee and provisional votes.”
 

While votes are still being counted, Romney is unlikely to catch up because there aren’t enough votes in Republican areas to make up the difference.

MIami-Dade’s election supervisor told CNN she’s “embarrassed” at the situation there. She blames high turnout and unusually long ballots in part for the slow process.

 

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