(Image source: NASA)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


If you already missed the New Year’s Eve fireworks, there’ll be another light show in the night sky soon: 2013’s first meteor shower.

The show will peak in the dark A.M. hours Thursday morning. It’s part of an annual meteor shower called ... what’s it called again? (Images via NASA)

“This is called the qua... Let me get this.”
“Yeah, go for it.”
“The quad-RONT-id... quad-RONT-id?”
(Video via CNN)

“It’s called QUANT-ra-dids, I hope I said that right...” (Video via WNBC)

“The QUANT-ra — the quad-RANT-ids. Is it quad-RANT-ids?” (Video via KOKI)

Space.com says it’s pronounced KWA-dran-tid. Let’s go with that.

So is it worth the tongue-twisters? A blogger for EarthSky seems to think so.

“Quadrantids might be the strongest and most famous major meteor shower that you’ve never seen. That’s because, although it can match the meteor numbers of the better-known … showers, the Quadrantids’ peak is very narrow.”

Other showers can peak over a matter of days, but the Quadrantids come and go in about six hours. (Images via NASA)

It can also be tricky to get a good view. Exactly when the peak occurs is sort of unpredictable. Plus Space.com says the faintest meteors...

“...will run into some stiff competition this year from a bright moon. … In one out of every three years, bright moonlight spoils the view and unfortunately, 2013 is one of those years.”

If you don’t feel like braving the cold, NASA will be livestreaming footage from one of its telescopes.

 

First Meteor Shower of the Year to be Outshined by Moon

by Steven Sparkman
0
Transcript
Jan 2, 2013

First Meteor Shower of the Year to be Outshined by Moon

 

(Image source: NASA)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


If you already missed the New Year’s Eve fireworks, there’ll be another light show in the night sky soon: 2013’s first meteor shower.

The show will peak in the dark A.M. hours Thursday morning. It’s part of an annual meteor shower called ... what’s it called again? (Images via NASA)

“This is called the qua... Let me get this.”
“Yeah, go for it.”
“The quad-RONT-id... quad-RONT-id?”
(Video via CNN)

“It’s called QUANT-ra-dids, I hope I said that right...” (Video via WNBC)

“The QUANT-ra — the quad-RANT-ids. Is it quad-RANT-ids?” (Video via KOKI)

Space.com says it’s pronounced KWA-dran-tid. Let’s go with that.

So is it worth the tongue-twisters? A blogger for EarthSky seems to think so.

“Quadrantids might be the strongest and most famous major meteor shower that you’ve never seen. That’s because, although it can match the meteor numbers of the better-known … showers, the Quadrantids’ peak is very narrow.”

Other showers can peak over a matter of days, but the Quadrantids come and go in about six hours. (Images via NASA)

It can also be tricky to get a good view. Exactly when the peak occurs is sort of unpredictable. Plus Space.com says the faintest meteors...

“...will run into some stiff competition this year from a bright moon. … In one out of every three years, bright moonlight spoils the view and unfortunately, 2013 is one of those years.”

If you don’t feel like braving the cold, NASA will be livestreaming footage from one of its telescopes.

 

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