(Image source: Fox News)


 

BY LOGAN TITTLE


 

 

E-cigarettes are once again lighting up health headlines.

 

 

The Federal Drug Administration is testing the product touted as a “healthier alternative” to smoking and is refusing entry of such e- products into the U.S. until an investigation concludes that they are indeed safe. (Via Bloomberg)

 

 

 

As the market for e-cigs continues to grow, public health officials are scurrying to figure out how safe they really are and have asked the FDA to step in once again.

 

 

Back in 2011, a federal appeals courts struck down the FDA’s plan to regulate e-cigs as a “drug,” which would have forced the manufacturers to prove they are safe. (Via PC Magazine)

 

 

 

Without this restriction, companies have been able to market e-cigarettes as the seemingly healthy smoking alternative. Thus ads aired on TV for the first time in 43 years. (Via Blu E-Cigs)

 

 

 

E-cigarettes contain a battery that heats up the nicotine inside so users inhale vapor instead of tar or ash. So far, it seems safer than the usual pack.

 

 

And Michael Siegel from Boston University’s School of Public Health told Inside Science the smokeless device could actually help people quit. (Via E-Cig Advanced)

 

 

 

“When you take away the tobacco and combustion then you’re taking away the bulk of the problem.” He also added, “It’s not a question of whether e-cigarettes are going to be regulated, it’s more about how they’re going be regulated.”

 

 

 

So, they might help you quit, but the question remains: are they really safe? Hosts on the TV talk show “The Doctors” weighed in.

 

 

Andrew: “We don’t want to get people on nicotine. That’s not good either. That constricts your blood vessels.”

Jim: “Yeah, that’s what leads to heart disease.”

Andrew: “But it’s a lot better than consuming all that tar and charcoal and...”

 

 

 

The FDA and U.S. medical companies are in agreement that more research is needed to determine the possible risks of smokeless smoking. So far the FDA has not released any proposed regulation plans.

 

 

According to The Wall Street Journal, the project’s director said any proposed rules will be issued to all interested parties at the same time.
 

 

FDA Investigating Safety of E-Cigs

by Logan Tittle
0
Transcript
Sep 4, 2013

FDA Investigating Safety of E-Cigs

(Image source: Fox News)


 

BY LOGAN TITTLE


 

 

E-cigarettes are once again lighting up health headlines.

 

 

The Federal Drug Administration is testing the product touted as a “healthier alternative” to smoking and is refusing entry of such e- products into the U.S. until an investigation concludes that they are indeed safe. (Via Bloomberg)

 

 

 

As the market for e-cigs continues to grow, public health officials are scurrying to figure out how safe they really are and have asked the FDA to step in once again.

 

 

Back in 2011, a federal appeals courts struck down the FDA’s plan to regulate e-cigs as a “drug,” which would have forced the manufacturers to prove they are safe. (Via PC Magazine)

 

 

 

Without this restriction, companies have been able to market e-cigarettes as the seemingly healthy smoking alternative. Thus ads aired on TV for the first time in 43 years. (Via Blu E-Cigs)

 

 

 

E-cigarettes contain a battery that heats up the nicotine inside so users inhale vapor instead of tar or ash. So far, it seems safer than the usual pack.

 

 

And Michael Siegel from Boston University’s School of Public Health told Inside Science the smokeless device could actually help people quit. (Via E-Cig Advanced)

 

 

 

“When you take away the tobacco and combustion then you’re taking away the bulk of the problem.” He also added, “It’s not a question of whether e-cigarettes are going to be regulated, it’s more about how they’re going be regulated.”

 

 

 

So, they might help you quit, but the question remains: are they really safe? Hosts on the TV talk show “The Doctors” weighed in.

 

 

Andrew: “We don’t want to get people on nicotine. That’s not good either. That constricts your blood vessels.”

Jim: “Yeah, that’s what leads to heart disease.”

Andrew: “But it’s a lot better than consuming all that tar and charcoal and...”

 

 

 

The FDA and U.S. medical companies are in agreement that more research is needed to determine the possible risks of smokeless smoking. So far the FDA has not released any proposed regulation plans.

 

 

According to The Wall Street Journal, the project’s director said any proposed rules will be issued to all interested parties at the same time.
 

 

View More
Comments
Newsy
www1