The FDA has approved a new medical device meant to reduce migraines.

The device is called Cefaly. Users wear it on their heads for about 20 minutes per day. And, so far, the battery-powered device doesn't have any known side effects. ABC explains how it works.

"This targets a nerve in the brain that is the major player in causing migraines. It stimulates that nerve and interrupts those signals." (Via ABC)

In a news release, a representative with the FDA said the device provides a new alternative to medications many migraine sufferers currently use to treat their symptoms.

And after recent tests, migraine sufferers have seen some positive results from this alternative.

A recent study showed almost 40 percent of the nearly 70 people studied saw the number of migraines drop by at least 50 percent. However, CNN points out Cefaly didn't make the intensity of the remaining migraines go down.

SlashGear adds Cefaly is only available with a perscription.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the device is already sold for retail Canada for about $300, and the vice president of the device's distributor says it would cost about the same in the U.S.

If you buy the device from Cefaly's website, though, it'll cost you about $350. So far, no reports on if any U.S. retail stores plan to put the device on their shelves.

FDA Approves Wearable Device Made To Reduce Headaches

by Collin Ruane
0
Transcript
Mar 12, 2014

FDA Approves Wearable Device Made To Reduce Headaches

(Image source: Cefaly)

BY Collin Ruane

The FDA has approved a new medical device meant to reduce migraines.

The device is called Cefaly. Users wear it on their heads for about 20 minutes per day. And, so far, the battery-powered device doesn't have any known side effects. ABC explains how it works.

"This targets a nerve in the brain that is the major player in causing migraines. It stimulates that nerve and interrupts those signals." (Via ABC)

In a news release, a representative with the FDA said the device provides a new alternative to medications many migraine sufferers currently use to treat their symptoms.

And after recent tests, migraine sufferers have seen some positive results from this alternative.

A recent study showed almost 40 percent of the nearly 70 people studied saw the number of migraines drop by at least 50 percent. However, CNN points out Cefaly didn't make the intensity of the remaining migraines go down.

SlashGear adds Cefaly is only available with a perscription.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the device is already sold for retail Canada for about $300, and the vice president of the device's distributor says it would cost about the same in the U.S.

If you buy the device from Cefaly's website, though, it'll cost you about $350. So far, no reports on if any U.S. retail stores plan to put the device on their shelves.

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