(Image Source: LightSquared.com)

 

BY BREANA JONES

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN


AT&T, Sprint, Verizon and... LightSquared? LightSquared had hopes to be the next major wireless broadband network in the U.S., but the Federal Communications Commission said no. Bloomberg explains why.

“The Federal Agencies coming out and saying that the Lightsquared network interferes with GPS devices and can’t be fixed and because of that the government is revoking its initial approval of the network.”

The FCC isn’t just worried about your Garmin not getting you to grandma’s house. The interference with GPS will affect U.S. military and aviation systems that rely on the same airwaves. Leaders in the industry say the risk is just too great.

“Operating on that upper 10 megahurtz of frequency, closest to GPS, all of the testing that’s been done so far, all of the analysis shows that would be catastrophic. You would have wide spread outages of GPS.” (Video Source: CSPAN)

You may be thinking... why don’t all these systems have their own frequencies? CNN explains it’s a bit more complicated than that.

“...the GPS companies have been jumping the fence for years, picking up signals transmitted through their neighbors' property. It had gone unnoticed, since LightSquared and its predecessors hadn't been using the spectrum until recently... Even though the interference issues aren't LightSquared's fault, the FCC said its hands are tied.”

A VP for LightSquared blasted the GPS companies— accusing them of using lobbying — not innovation — to protect their systems.

“Like Wall Street, the manufacturers of GPS devices have spent years profiting off of vulnerable technology and are now seeking protection from the government instead of implementing the necessary reforms.”

TIME says the biggest loser in the decision isn’t Lightsquared, but the public that’s missing out on a greater selection of wireless providers.



“LightSquared had struck wholesale deals with many smaller, regionally-based companies eager to offer broadband — companies that would have been able to bring-much needed competition into the market, putting downward pressure on prices.”
 

FCC Denies LightSquared, Cites GPS Interference

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Sources:CNNTime
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Feb 16, 2012

FCC Denies LightSquared, Cites GPS Interference

(Image Source: LightSquared.com)

 

BY BREANA JONES

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN


AT&T, Sprint, Verizon and... LightSquared? LightSquared had hopes to be the next major wireless broadband network in the U.S., but the Federal Communications Commission said no. Bloomberg explains why.

“The Federal Agencies coming out and saying that the Lightsquared network interferes with GPS devices and can’t be fixed and because of that the government is revoking its initial approval of the network.”

The FCC isn’t just worried about your Garmin not getting you to grandma’s house. The interference with GPS will affect U.S. military and aviation systems that rely on the same airwaves. Leaders in the industry say the risk is just too great.

“Operating on that upper 10 megahurtz of frequency, closest to GPS, all of the testing that’s been done so far, all of the analysis shows that would be catastrophic. You would have wide spread outages of GPS.” (Video Source: CSPAN)

You may be thinking... why don’t all these systems have their own frequencies? CNN explains it’s a bit more complicated than that.

“...the GPS companies have been jumping the fence for years, picking up signals transmitted through their neighbors' property. It had gone unnoticed, since LightSquared and its predecessors hadn't been using the spectrum until recently... Even though the interference issues aren't LightSquared's fault, the FCC said its hands are tied.”

A VP for LightSquared blasted the GPS companies— accusing them of using lobbying — not innovation — to protect their systems.

“Like Wall Street, the manufacturers of GPS devices have spent years profiting off of vulnerable technology and are now seeking protection from the government instead of implementing the necessary reforms.”

TIME says the biggest loser in the decision isn’t Lightsquared, but the public that’s missing out on a greater selection of wireless providers.



“LightSquared had struck wholesale deals with many smaller, regionally-based companies eager to offer broadband — companies that would have been able to bring-much needed competition into the market, putting downward pressure on prices.”
 

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