(Thumbnail Image: CNET)

 

"We started thinking about a Web where the default was social.  We wondered what kind of great personalized experiences we could build if we worked with just a small group of trusted companies to make it so that users could go from Facebook to other services." (Microsoft PressPass)


That's Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at the company's conference for third party developers in San Francisco — he announced a new batch of social plugins for websites.  Zuckerberg hopes the plugins will combine Facebook with smaller sites into a more social Web.

On CNBC, a reporter explains how three of these social plugins will improve Facebook users' Web experience.

"One is that social plugin, that Like button, that they're launching with 30 partners, including IMDB and ESPN.  That means you can go on to IMDB or ESPN, say a movie you like, say athlete you like and it will show up on your personal profile page ... Also a recommendation plugin.  They'll recommend different articles, restaurants based upon what your friends like.  And a social bar, so you could be on any website and if they install the social bar, you could chat with your friends via Facebook without ever going to Facebook.com." 

A blogger on The Big Money says developers who expect to benefit from Facebook's social plugins are making a risky assumption  that Facebook users will use them.

"All of these sites will almost certainly get greater content distribution and/or recognition on Facebook. But they're also betting that their customers/fans/readers will 'like' the new, more personalized integration and won't find it annoying or invasive."

But on The Wall Street Journal's "Digits," a social networking analyst says the social plugins will benefit Facebook and advertisers, not users  they'll lose more privacy.

"In order to be successful when it comes to advertising and marketing, companies realize they want to be on the open Web and Facebook's primary promise is to be that closed experience on Facebook.com, now they have to extend that experience beyond that in order for the advertisements to spread.  Now it's a real a conundrum, Stacey, because in order to do that, they need to change the promise they made to users of it being a safe and secure private area."

On BNET, a blogger says good or bad, Facebook's new social plugins for developers may change the Web as we know it.

"Considering the heavyweight partners the site already has lined up — and the fact that it is the world’s largest, fastest growing social network — there is a lot of momentum for Facebook’s new approach to truly change the way the Web works."

So what do you think? Do you "Like" Facebook's new social plugins, or are they just another tool for advertisers?
 
Writer: Courtney Cebula
Producer: Courtney Cebula

Facebook Unveils Social Plugins For Developers

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Apr 22, 2010

Facebook Unveils Social Plugins For Developers

(Thumbnail Image: CNET)

 

"We started thinking about a Web where the default was social.  We wondered what kind of great personalized experiences we could build if we worked with just a small group of trusted companies to make it so that users could go from Facebook to other services." (Microsoft PressPass)


That's Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at the company's conference for third party developers in San Francisco — he announced a new batch of social plugins for websites.  Zuckerberg hopes the plugins will combine Facebook with smaller sites into a more social Web.

On CNBC, a reporter explains how three of these social plugins will improve Facebook users' Web experience.

"One is that social plugin, that Like button, that they're launching with 30 partners, including IMDB and ESPN.  That means you can go on to IMDB or ESPN, say a movie you like, say athlete you like and it will show up on your personal profile page ... Also a recommendation plugin.  They'll recommend different articles, restaurants based upon what your friends like.  And a social bar, so you could be on any website and if they install the social bar, you could chat with your friends via Facebook without ever going to Facebook.com." 

A blogger on The Big Money says developers who expect to benefit from Facebook's social plugins are making a risky assumption  that Facebook users will use them.

"All of these sites will almost certainly get greater content distribution and/or recognition on Facebook. But they're also betting that their customers/fans/readers will 'like' the new, more personalized integration and won't find it annoying or invasive."

But on The Wall Street Journal's "Digits," a social networking analyst says the social plugins will benefit Facebook and advertisers, not users  they'll lose more privacy.

"In order to be successful when it comes to advertising and marketing, companies realize they want to be on the open Web and Facebook's primary promise is to be that closed experience on Facebook.com, now they have to extend that experience beyond that in order for the advertisements to spread.  Now it's a real a conundrum, Stacey, because in order to do that, they need to change the promise they made to users of it being a safe and secure private area."

On BNET, a blogger says good or bad, Facebook's new social plugins for developers may change the Web as we know it.

"Considering the heavyweight partners the site already has lined up — and the fact that it is the world’s largest, fastest growing social network — there is a lot of momentum for Facebook’s new approach to truly change the way the Web works."

So what do you think? Do you "Like" Facebook's new social plugins, or are they just another tool for advertisers?
 
Writer: Courtney Cebula
Producer: Courtney Cebula
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